Unions

Corruption-Free? Not so Fast

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Thu, 07/24/2014 - 11:06

July 24, 2014: Hoffa claims there’s no need for an anti-corruption body in our union because corruption is a thing of the past. Meanwhile, two Hoffa campaign donors have been busted this week on charges of stealing members’ dues and taking employer payoffs.

The Hoffa administration has retained two attorneys who formerly worked for President George W. Bush to try to end the members Right to Vote, and also the Independent Review Board (IRB). 

The IRB independently investigates corruption in the Teamsters. The Hoffa administration says the IRB should be eliminated because Teamster corruption is a thing of the past.

That is news to Teamster members in Connecticut Local 1150 where the IRB has charged the top official with embezzling union funds and in St. Louis area construction locals where the IRB has caught a union representative taking payoffs in exchange for sweetheart contracts.

When TDU was founded organized crime dominated the Teamsters Union at its highest levels. There’s no doubt that Teamster corruption is down since then, but that is precisely because members have the Right to Vote and an independent anti-corruption watchdog.

TDU is organizing members to defend the Right to Vote and root out corruption in the union. If you share these goals, you can say so by signing this petition.

More coverage:

IRB Charges Connecticut Local 1150 President

IRB Charges St. Louis Bad Apple

Petition: Don’t Let Hoffa End Fair Elections in the Teamsters

Issues: Local Union ReformHoffa Watch
Categories: Labor News, Unions

IRB Charges Connecticut Local 1150 President with Embezzlement

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Thu, 07/24/2014 - 10:59

July 24, 2014: The Independent Review Board (IRB) has brought embezzlement charges against Harvey Jackson, the president of Local 1150, which represents Sikorsky Aircraft Teamsters at plants in Connecticut, Alabama, and Florida.

The charges and investigative report are available here.

Jackson is charged with using the union credit card to buy at least $13,000 worth of electronics for his personal use, including: expensive projectors, speakers, cameras, cell phones, DVD player, Blu-ray player, a laptop, Bose headphones, and more.

Jackson was paid $141,744 in salary in 2013 by Local 1150. He should buy his own electronics. 

Issues: Local Union Reform
Categories: Labor News, Unions

St Louis: IRB Charges St. Louis Bad Apple

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Thu, 07/24/2014 - 10:56

July 24, 2014: The Independent Review Board (IRB) has brought serious charges against Timothy Ryan, a former construction industry union rep for employer payoffs, diverting jobs to his friends, and conducting a bogus contract vote.  

Fortunately, Ryan is no longer a union rep, as his activities were exposed within the union.  

The IRB charges and report are available here.

Ryan served as the construction industry BA starting in 2009, until he was fired in 2012 by Local 525 principal officer Thomas Pelot, who became aware of his shameful betrayal of Teamster principles. Unfortunately, he was again hired as a BA, by St Louis Local 682 in 2013 and served until he resigned last month, with IRB charges coming.

Ryan is charged with payoff from a construction company, Stutz Excavating, in the form of free construction work at his home, and free automobiles supplied by a dealership owned by the Stutz family. He approved a substandard contract with Stutz without a secret ballot vote of the members, and even tried to extend concessions to other locals, including Local 50, for Stutz. He is also charged with manipulating the union referral list to get jobs improperly for his brother, sister, uncle, and several friends   

When the IRB questioned him, he invoked his Fifth Amendment rights in response to key questions involving alleged gifts from the employer.

Thankfully, his Teamster career of misdeeds appears to be over.

Issues: Local Union Reform
Categories: Labor News, Unions

Workers vote to unionize at three Hostess cake plants

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Thu, 07/24/2014 - 07:50
Josh SoslandBaking BusinessJuly 24, 2014View the original piece

Workers at three of the four snack cake plants operated by Hostess Brands L.L.C. have voted to unionize, according to the union representing the bakery workers.

The three plants are located in Indianapolis; Schiller Park, Ill.; and Columbus, Ga. The votes to unionize at the plants were confirmed by a spokesperson for the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco and Grain Millers International Union July 17. The spokesperson declined to elaborate further on the vote.

Click here to read more.

Issues: Labor Movement
Categories: Labor News, Unions

Historic 1934 Minneapolis Teamster Strike Commemorated

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Thu, 07/24/2014 - 07:36

July 24, 2014: A series of events – a march, rally, concert, and picnic – were held July 19-20 to commemorate the 80th anniversary of the historic 1934 Minneapolis Teamster strike. Hundreds of people turned out to honor this historic labor victory.

Picnic goers heard speakers who talked about current labor struggles and organizing drives. The program was chaired by TDU activist and Local 120 retiree Bob McNattin as well as SEIU member Linda Leighton – a granddaughter of V.R. Dunne, one of the 1934 Teamster leaders. A couple of Teamster officials spoke, including Paul Slattery, the political and organizing representative of Teamsters Local 120.

Music was coordinated by Larry Long, a pro-labor singer. A solidarity chorus from Wisconsin pitched in as well.

The weekend kicked off with a march, sponsored by Teamsters Local 120, which included a brass band playing the labor anthem, “Which Side Are You On?”

Labor’s Turning Point

The 1934 Minneapolis Teamster strike grew into a broad workers struggle. Their slogan was “Make Minneapolis a Union Town” and they did it. The strike leaders – with no help initially from the International union – went to organize trucking across the Midwest and beyond.

A young Teamster from Detroit named James R. Hoffa joined in that organizing effort. In Hoffa’s autobiography, he stated that Minneapolis leader Farrell Dobbs was his greatest teacher.

The Teamsters union grew in the next decade from a small craft union to a mighty industrial force, and the Minneapolis strikers provided much of the inspiration and the leadership. 

Issues: Labor Movement
Categories: Labor News, Unions

August 2nd: the Second Annual Frank Little Memorial!

IWW - Wed, 07/23/2014 - 14:27

I.W.W. organizer Frank Little was in Butte, Montana, in the summer of 1917, organizing for the OBU after the disastrous Granite Mountain - Speculator Mine fire that killed 168 miners earlier that year. Early in the morning of August First, agents of the Copper Trust forced their way into his rooming house, dragged him out, and lynched him from a railroad trestle. He's buried in a Butte cemetery.

Fellow Workers will meet at Stodden Park in Butte (directions below) at noon on August 2nd for a potluck lunch and to get acquainted or re-acquainted, maybe have a brief organizing meeting; and maybe, if we're so inclined and anyone brings instruments, some music.

Then, after the potluck we'll convoy a mile or so down to the cemetery where FW Little is buried, have a brief ceremony, and hopefully some inspiring soapbox speeches and more music; and if necessary, do a little tidying up around FW Little's gravesite.

All this will be pretty informal, without a formal program or a rigid time schedule.

Remember, this will be a potluck, so bring something to eat, and enough extra to share !

read more

Categories: Unions

Employees May Decline FMLA

IBU - Tue, 07/22/2014 - 13:31
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Categories: Unions

WSF 2015-17 TA'd Proposals Ratification Vote

IBU - Tue, 07/22/2014 - 10:44
Members of the WSF 2015-17 Negotiating Committee will be fanning out throughout the ferry system starting today and for the next several days to give members an opportunity to cast a YES or NO vote regarding the TA'd proposals over work rule changes in their CBA.
Categories: Unions

Wobblies at Prominent New York Baking Company Heighten Struggle Against Private Equity Owners

IWW - Tue, 07/22/2014 - 10:00

By Lawrence Goun and Biko Koenig

Workers at Tom Cat Bakery sharpened their resistance against company attacks this summer with a solidarity BBQ in front of the Queens-based factory. Tom Cat's private equity owners, Ancor and Merit Capital, are seeking devastating health care cuts and other takeaways from workers in contract negotiations with the Bakery Union. Dual-card IWW members are leading a struggle to build long-term power and secure a good contract, after beating back a de-certification attempt from a mob-dominated union earlier this year.

“These out-of-town investors already have their mansions, while we barely can support our families. The cuts they're demanding are impossible and we're united against them,” said Marino Aquino, a night-shift packer at Tom Cat and a member of the IWW. “Our unity is our strength and we will keep the pressure on until justice prevails.”

read more

Categories: Unions

PMA and ILWU Provide Update on Contract Talks

ILWU - Fri, 07/18/2014 - 15:47

SAN FRANCISCO (July 18, 2014) – The International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU) and the Pacific Maritime Association (PMA) today issued the following statement:

After several days of ongoing talks, both parties will break from negotiations next Monday and Tuesday in order for the ILWU to convene its previously scheduled Longshore Division Caucus in San Francisco. Negotiations are scheduled to resume Wednesday.

No talks will take place July 28 to Aug. 1 so the ILWU can resume unrelated contract negotiations in the Pacific Northwest.

The previous labor contract covering nearly 20,000 longshore workers at 29 West Coast ports expired July 1. While there is no contract extension in place, both parties have pledged to keep cargo moving.

The coast-wide labor contract is between employers who operate port terminals and shipping lines represented by the PMA and dockworkers represented by the ILWU. The parties have negotiated a West Coast collective bargaining agreement since the 1930s.

Download a pdf of the release here.

Categories: Unions

Daimler Demonstrates a Self-Driving Truck

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Fri, 07/18/2014 - 09:36
Melissa EddyThe New York TimesJuly 18, 2014View the original piece

For Daimler, the truck driver of the future looks something like this: He is seated in the cab of a semi, eyes on a tablet and hands resting in his lap.

Daimler demonstrated its vision Thursday along a stretch of the A14 autobahn near Magdeburg in eastern Germany, the culmination of years of innovation. It says the vehicle — called the Mercedes-Benz Future Truck 2025, a nod to the year the carmaker hopes it will be introduced — is capable of responding to traffic while driving completely autonomously down a freeway at speeds of up to 85 kilometers per hour, or 52 miles per hour.

Click here to read more at The New York Times.

Issues: Freight
Categories: Labor News, Unions

Hoffa Threatens Teamster Democracy

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Thu, 07/17/2014 - 07:43
Ken PaffLabor NotesJuly 17, 2014View the original piece

Facing fresh member dissatisfaction, Teamster President James Hoffa and his Secretary-Treasurer Ken Hall are headed to court to try to make contested Teamster elections a thing of the past.

Whether they succeed will determine the future of one of North America’s most powerful unions. Will it continue to manage decline and concessions, or tap the power of organized transport and distribution workers to reverse them?

The 1.25 million-member International Brotherhood of Teamsters (IBT) is unique among the largest North American unions in that every five years it has a hotly contested rank-and-file election for the top leadership.

The right to vote is protected by a 1989 consent order, a court-approved agreement that Teamster officers reluctantly accepted to avoid a racketeering trial.

In that landmark legal case, the reform movement Teamsters for a Democratic Union intervened to oppose court-imposed government oversight of the union’s operations. Instead, to root out systemic corruption, TDU proposed that members directly elect top officers.

Previously, Teamster presidents were elected at conventions. The 1986 “election” gave incumbent Jackie Presser 99 percent of the vote.

USING THE VOTE

TDU’s blueprint was largely adopted, and 1991 saw the first-ever election. Members used their new vote to elect a whole new leadership slate, headed by Ron Carey. The candidate who’d gotten 1 percent under the old system, Sam Theodus, easily won the rank-and-file vote for vice president.

The election rocked not only the Teamsters, but the labor movement. The first-ever contested election in the AFL-CIO quickly followed.

After Carey won again in 1996, defeating Hoffa, he led UPS workers out on strike in 1997. With bold demands such as 10,000 more full-time jobs (with the rallying cry, “Part-Time America Won’t Work”) and innovative tactics that evolved over the year of rank-and-file organizing leading up it, this strike started to put labor on the offensive.

That success was tragically cut short later that year when aides to Carey were found engaging in illegal campaign fundraising. The scandal paved the way for Hoffa’s rise and the old guard’s return to power.

Now the Hoffa administration has taken the first step to try to end the consent order by submitting a letter to federal judge Loretta Preska. The IBT claims the consent order is no longer needed because the union is reformed.

The U.S. Attorney and TDU have submitted letters opposing the change . TDU is also intervening in the court proceedings and has launched a campaign  to defend the right to vote.

TDU agrees that mob control of the union has diminished—precisely because the right to vote has given members a tool to tackle corruption and hold leaders accountable.

Other unions have membership elections in their constitution, but what makes the Teamsters unique is independently supervised elections, coupled with an organized national reform movement of leaders, activists, and members. It’s TDU that gives life to members’ right to vote.

‘GOVERNMENT OVERSIGHT’

Hoffa and Hall claim their goal is to end government oversight. But their real target is the one-member, one-vote elections.

To be clear, there is no “government oversight” of any of the union’s operations—not bargaining, political action, organizing, contract campaigns, budgets, salaries, or hiring and firing.

Instead, the consent order provides for an Independent Review Board, selected by IBT leadership and the U.S. Attorney, to bring corruption charges against individual officials. And it provides for the right to vote for international officers under fair election rules.

Both are important to members, but the right to vote is the most critical.

Without these rules, the current leaders will be free to change nomination requirements to make it impossible for opposition candidates to get on the ballot.

Currently, nominations for top offices require 5 percent of elected convention delegates. But the incumbents want to raise that bar.

Every challenger to Hoffa has met the 5 percent requirement, but none would have been nominated if 10 percent were required—though each, once nominated, ran a competitive race and forced national debates on the union’s direction.

Teamster leaders have already amended the IBT constitution so the board can write its own rules for any election and pick the election supervisor. For now, these amendments are trumped by the provisions of the consent order.

But if the consent order were lifted, these safeguards would go out the window.

So would election rules that partially level the playing field by providing opposition campaigners’ access to employer parking lots, “battle pages” of campaign material in the Teamster magazine, and fair rules for delegate elections.

WHY NOW?

Hoffa and Hall have good reason to make this move now. Hoffa, who won reelection in 2011 with 59 percent of the vote, faces a different political outlook as the 2015-2016 campaign approaches.

Over the past year, the majority of members in the freight industry, UPS Freight, and UPS have all voted to reject concessions in their contracts—only to have them imposed by Hoffa and Hall.

The Vote No movement helped launch a new formation, Take Back Our Union, that’s already organizing meetings to plan for the 2016 election.

Hoffa won most of the UPS locals in 2011. But his prospects among that group of 250,000 Teamsters look much dimmer today. And dissatisfaction is not limited to just UPS and trucking Teamsters: Hoffa’s policy of retreat has led to defeats and lackluster organizing in warehousing, delivery, public service, airlines, and other Teamster fields.

Take Back Our Union has started to forge a coalition of the opposition forces in the union, bringing together TDU, which backed New York Local 805 President Sandy Pope in the 2011 election, and other local officials who ran on a separate slate.

Combined, these contenders won 41 percent last time—and that was before this wave of membership anger at concessions.

Once again, members are gearing up to take the wheel of the union.

Issues: Hoffa Watch
Categories: Labor News, Unions

Ship’s seafaring crew in Long Beach, CA organize picket line to protest outlaw employer; request support from the ITF and ILWU

ILWU - Wed, 07/16/2014 - 15:04

Twenty-one crewmembers serving on the Liberian-flagged vessel Vega-Reederei have organized a picket line at the Port of Long Beach, CA, to protest their employer’s failure to pay workers for up to four months of back wages. Abuses of seafaring crew are common in the global shipping industry, and workers often hail from low-wage counties with few rights.

The crew of mostly Filipino nationals is seeking assistance from the International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF) and support from dockworkers belonging to the International Longshore & Warehouse Union (ILWU).

A German company, Arend Bruegge, is listed as the ship’s operator, and is said to owe workers more than $150,000 in unpaid wages. The company has a history of failing to pay crewmembers on other vessels operated by the Hamburg-based firm.

Earlier today, desperate crewmembers contacted Stefan Mueller-Dombois, an Inspector for the International Transport Workers’ Federation in Southern California.  The crew pleaded for the ITF to help because workers’ families living in the Philippines haven’t received any wages in months and are going hungry.

The ITF has been working with ship operator to reach a settlement, but as of 2:30pm Pacific Time, company officials were refusing to negotiate with Mueller-Dumbois, and threatened to leave the berth without paying crewmembers.

The ship is carrying a cargo of wind turbines.  At the ship’s previous port of call in Korea, the company made promises to pay but failed to do so.  Workers were told that complaints about the failure to pay would cause the company to replace them with a Chinese crew.

Eleven of the ship’s seafaring crew say the company has kept them on board the ship beyond the original commitment, and are demanding to be repatriated and flown home to the Philippines immediately.

“It appears that this company has done this before by refusing to pay crewmembers on the ships they operate, “ said ITF West Coast Coordinator Jeff Engels.  “The crew are seeking justice and support from other maritime workers in the area.”  Engels said that ITF Inspector Stefan Mueller-Dumbois is contacting the ship’s owners to seek immediate payment for the crewmembers – and a written agreement that will prevent similar incidents from happening in the future.

“Our job is to help crewmembers from being exploited by powerful, international corporations that own and operate these vessels,” said Engels.

Categories: Unions

Bloody Thursday 1934: The strike that shook San Francisco and rocked the Pacific Coast

ILWU - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 14:35
by CAL WINSLOW on July 3, 2014

July 5, 2014 marks the 80th anniversary of “Bloody Thursday”, July 5, 1934, a day that shook San Francisco. The events that day inflamed the working people of San Francisco and the Bay Area. They made the great General Strike of 1934 inevitable and they set in motion a movement that would transform the western waterfronts.

On May 9, 1934 West Coast longshoremen struck, shutting down docks along 2000 miles of coastline, including all its major ports: Seattle, Tacoma, Portland, San Francisco, San Pedro, San Diego. The issues included wages and hours: the longshoremen wanted $1 an hour, the six hour day and the thirty hour week. They wanted union representation. But above all they demanded the abolition of the hated shape-up and its replacement with a union hiring hall. The strike would last 83 days.

The San Francisco longshoremen called the Embarcadero “the slave market” – there, each morning at 8 am, workers would gather, as often as not desperate for any opportunity to work. Many more would gather than were needed, some would be skilled, “regular men”, others transients, then all grades in between. The hiring boss, the petty dictator on the dock, would stand before them; he could take any man he wanted, reject anyone he pleased. This was an ancient system. Henry Mayhew, the well-known Victorian investigator, wrote this of hiring at the gates to the London docks in1861: it was “a sight to sadden the most callous, to see thousands of men struggling for only a day’s hire; the scuffle being made the fiercer by the knowledge that hundreds out of the number there assembled left to idle the day in want.” The shape-up was abolished in London in 1891, in the aftermath of the great 1889 dockers’ strike there, but was still in place in 1934 in New York, also San Francisco, where the shippers insisted conditions demanded it. Profits depended, they explained, on the fast turn-around, but the sea, the tides, and traffic limited planning. Still, “the ship must sail on time”; they clung tenaciously to the system, casual labor and the shape-up. The leaders of the dockers’ union, the racket-ridden International Longshoremen’s Association (ILA), in 1934 very much in the doldrums, agreed. Joe Ryan, ILA “President for Life” supported it, even after World War II. The men despised it, a precarious, cruel system that placed them at the bottom of the hierarchy of industrial work.

Read full article at BeyondChron

Categories: Unions

PBGC Chief to Re-join Private Sector

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 09:17
Elizabeth PfeutiAsset InternationalJuly 15, 2014View the original piece

The director of the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation (PBGC) is to leave his post in August after four years in the role.

In a letter to colleagues on Friday, Josh Gotbaum said, as he had three children in college, he had promised his wife he would return to the private sector, the Wall Street Journal (WSJ) reported.

Click here to read more at Asset International.

Issues: Labor Movement
Categories: Labor News, Unions

Amazon Seeks FAA Permission to Test Delivery Drones Outdoors

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Tue, 07/15/2014 - 07:13
Bloomberg NewsJuly 15, 2014View the original piece

Amazon.com Inc., which wants to deliver packages by drone, asked aviation regulators for permission to expand testing outside its research laboratory.

“We are rapidly experimenting and iterating on Prime Air inside our next generation research and development lab in Seattle,” the company said in a letter posted on a government website yesterday. Amazon is based in that city.

Click here to read more at Transport Topics.

Categories: Labor News, Unions

IBT Picks Roadway labor relations man for YRC Board

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Mon, 07/14/2014 - 13:39
Austin AlonzoKansas City Business JournalJuly 14, 2014View the original piece

Late Friday, the Overland Park-based less-than-truckload carrier (Nasdaq: YRCW) and the International Brotherhood of Teamsters announced that the union-nominated and the company-approvedDavidson will join YRC's nine-member board.

Davidson will fill the seat Harry Wilsonvacated in March. Wilson, the chairman and CEO of New York-based MAEVA Group LLC, resigned from the board after seeing the company through a financial restructuring in early 2014. Between February 2013 and March 2014, YRC paid MAEVA $12.5 million for its services.

Click here to read more at The Kansas City Business Journal.

Issues: Freight
Categories: Labor News, Unions

PMA and ILWU Provide Update on Contract Talks

ILWU - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 17:06

SAN FRANCISCO (July 11, 2014) – The International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU) and the Pacific Maritime Association (PMA) today issued the following statement:

The parties have resumed negotiations following a three-day break during which the ILWU was engaged in an unrelated negotiation in the Pacific Northwest. We plan on negotiating into the weekend. Although there is currently no contract in place, both parties have pledged to keep cargo moving.

The PMA and ILWU are negotiating a new contract covering nearly 20,000 longshore workers at 29 West Coast ports.

Download a PDF of the press release here.

Categories: Unions

Ad campaign warns of threat of inexperienced tug operators

ILWU - Fri, 07/11/2014 - 11:08

Ads by Masters, Mates & Pilots and the Inlandboatmen’s Union ‘allege safety, environmental risks brought on by lockout by grain companies,’ reports the Columbian:

“Two maritime unions said Monday they’ve launched a radio ad campaign to focus attention on what they say are safety and environmental risks to the Columbia and Willamette rivers brought on by a lockout of union dockworkers by two grain companies.

The ads, paid for by the International Organization of Masters, Mates & Pilots and the Inlandboatmen’s Union, say United Grain Corp. at the Port of Vancouver and Columbia Grain in Portland are “using inexperienced crews to move cargo” on the Columbia and Willamette rivers.

United Grain and Columbia Grain “have called in a fly-by-night tug and towboat operator using questionable equipment and tugboat personnel with no prior experience on the Columbia and Willamette rivers,” Alan Cote, president of the Inlandboatmen’s Union, said in a news release. “Unqualified boat operators jeopardize the safety of commerce on our rivers and invite an environmental disaster.”

The maritime unions say they’re joined by environmentalists in running the ad campaign, which also urges listeners to sign an online petition, www.SaveNWrivers.com.”

Listen to the radio spot here.

 

 

Categories: Unions

Teamsters rank and file digging in against possible pension benefit cuts

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Thu, 07/10/2014 - 14:06
John D. SchulzLogistics ManagementJuly 10, 2014View the original piece

Teamsters retirees from the trucking industry currently enjoy some of the most generous pensions in America—up to $3,500 a month for 30 years of service from any unionized trucking company that contributed to multiemployer pension plans that once covered the industry like a warm fuzzy financial security blanket.
  
But those pension plans, once thought to be the “Cadillac” of all retirement plans, are in deep financial trouble. And there doesn’t appear to be any bailout coming from Washington.

Click here to read more at Logistics Management.

Categories: Labor News, Unions

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