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The Danger of Forcing Truck Drivers to Drive Sleep-Deprived Exposed

Current News - Fri, 09/19/2014 - 12:44

The Danger of Forcing Truck Drivers to Drive Sleep-Deprived Exposed
http://abcnews.go.com/US/danger-forcing-truck-drivers-drive-sleep-depriv...
Sep 18, 2014, 1:20 PM ET
By JOSEPH RHEE and ALEXA VALIENTE via 20/20

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Out on the road, one trucker says many companies put unrelenting pressure on drivers to make sure loads are delivered on time.

“Driving a semi-tractor like this, any small mistake can take a life,” Abe Attallah, 28, from the Detroit, Michigan area, told ABC News’ “20/20.”

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Tight deadlines can mean more hours behind the wheel with fewer opportunities to rest, and drivers are only paid when the wheels are rolling.

“You know, we are the most familiar and generally the safest people to drive next to on the road,” Attallah said. “But there are the circumstances where companies and drivers will put money ahead of safety.”

Watch the full story on ABC News' "20/20" on Friday, Sept. 19 at 10 p.m. ET.

Log books are used in order to verify that a trucker is not spending too much time behind the wheel. According to Attallah, some drivers simply resort to falsifying their log books so they can stay out on the road.

“There is a lot of drivers out there who purposely break their logs and, you know, manipulate the log books to get more miles in the day,” he said. “They’ll show themselves sleeping, [but] then they are really out on the road.”

But modifying these log books can have tragic consequences.

This July, a speeding trucker in Illinois crashed into three vehicles, killing five people. The truck driver was charged with falsifying his log book. Prosecutors said he had actually been on the road for 12 straight hours.

In another Illinois crash this year, a toll worker was killed and a state trooper was seriously injured by a trucker who had been up for 36 straight hours. The trucker was also accused of falsifying his log book.

But there may be no clearer example of the pressure that truckers face to stay out longer on the road than what Attallah said happened to him last February. In the dead of night, Attallah was hauling a load of tomatoes to Wisconsin. About four hours into the nearly 400-mile run, Attallah said he started having trouble staying awake and was drifting into what truckers call, “microsleep.”

“Basically, your eyes are open. Your hands are on the wheel, but your brain shuts off for three to four seconds,” he explained.

Attallah said the reason he was so fatigued was that he had too much time off before the run. Federal law mandates that truckers get a rest period of 10 hours between jobs. But after coming off a mandatory break for 10 hours where he slept well, Attallah said his company gave him a short haul job that Attallah said only took one hour. He said his company then told him to immediately take another 10 hours off.

After having slept during his first 10-hour break, Attallah said he couldn't go back to sleep during his second break. “I am not a robot. I don’t have an on and off switch, you know?” he said.

The schedule was disastrous for his body clock, which is why he was so exhausted on his overnight run to Wisconsin, Attallah said.

Worried he might cause an accident, he pulled into a truck stop and called his company dispatcher, which he caught on a video that he later uploaded onto YouTube.

“I've only got a couple hours of sleep. I've been awake too long. I can’t drive no more,” Attallah can be seen telling the dispatcher in the video.

The dispatcher told him to drink some coffee and to go outside and walk around the truck, which Attallah had already done. He was then put on hold and transferred to another dispatcher, who also told him to get coffee and that no other trucker would be able to retrieve Attallah's load.

“I just don’t want to hurt anyone out here,” Attallah told a third dispatcher.

“You don’t need to jump to that. That’s dramatic [expletive] I don’t need this morning. I’m going to tell you. You’re not going to hurt anybody,” the third dispatcher can be heard telling Attallah in the video.

“It was very clear at that point that he didn't care about human life. He just cared about that load and making that money,” Attallah said of the call.

Eventually, the company sent another driver to rescue his load of tomatoes to that he could get some rest, but the third dispatcher made sure Attallah knew there would be serious consequences for him making that phone call.

“You wonder where your paycheck went this week? It came down to where it went tonight. Are we clear on that?” the third dispatcher told him, according to Attallah. Attallah was not docked pay for the incident.

The company Attallah worked for declined to comment to “20/20” about the incident involving Attallah. But the head of the American Trucking Associations, Bill Graves, said that if a trucker says they are too tired to drive safely, companies cannot require them to continue driving.

“The driver was obviously doing the right thing, and the dispatcher was obviously doing the wrong thing,” Graves told “20/20.” “There’s just too much at stake when you have a commercial vehicle with some sort of payload going down the nation’s highways with a fatigued driver.”

A few months ago, Attallah quit his job at the trucking company and is now driving trucks between the oil shale fields of western Pennsylvania. He said he’s proud of exposing one of the industry’s biggest dangers.

“This is the side of trucking that people never see,” Attallah said.

“This is the kind of treatment that drivers have been putting up with for so long, because we know that our jobs are on the line here.”

Tune in for the full story on ABC News' "20/20" on Friday, Sept. 19 at 10 p.m. ET

Categories: Labor News

DHL Delhi workers hold day of action against harassment

ITF - Fri, 09/19/2014 - 08:49
Members of the DHL Employees Union in Delhi and their families are staging a family dharna (sit in) on 21 September, to protest against reported harassment and victimisation by the company.
Categories: Union Federations

Groundbreaking training to help Arab World women trade unionists set agenda

ITF - Fri, 09/19/2014 - 08:33
A groundbreaking women’s leadership training programme started today (Monday) and will be followed on 19 September by a one-day meeting of the ITF’s Arab World women’s committee members to set their work programme for the next four years.
Categories: Union Federations

Global: Brands say they will pay more for clothes made in Cambodia

Labourstart.org News - Thu, 09/18/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: IndustriALL Global Union
Categories: Labor News

Global: Support IndustriALL’s STOP Precarious Work campaign with Thunderclap

Labourstart.org News - Thu, 09/18/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: IndustriALL Global Union
Categories: Labor News

Cambodia: Court Places More Restrictions on Union Leader

Labourstart.org News - Thu, 09/18/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: The Daily
Categories: Labor News

Bangladesh: 30 hurt as management staff beat up workers trying to form union

Labourstart.org News - Thu, 09/18/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: The Daily Star
Categories: Labor News

UK: Scottish TUC: Referendum was a triumph for democracy

Labourstart.org News - Thu, 09/18/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: STUC
Categories: Labor News

Sweden: Former union leader welcomed as he is elected Swedish PM

Labourstart.org News - Thu, 09/18/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: IndustriALL Global Union
Categories: Labor News

Canadian National Railway Gets First Fine for Not Moving Enough Grain

Railroaded's Blog - Thu, 09/18/2014 - 10:31

Canadian National Railway is being fined by the federal government under the Fair Rail for Grain Farmers Act for failing to move a minimum amount of grain each week (Globe and Mail). The monetary penalty, which has yet to be determined but can be up to $100,000 a week, is the first to be charged under the federal legislation which was passed in the spring to address grain farmers’ complaints that Canada’s two major railways were providing poor service, resulting in significant financial losses to farmers. Grain farmers were also claiming, at the same time, that CN and CP were dedicating too much of their efforts to hauling crude oil and other petroleum products, at the expense of the grain industry.

Canada’s Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz said he was “concerned” CN was not meeting the minimum volume requirements. He said, “Using all means available, our government will continue to defend farmers and all shippers to ensure that our economy is well served by Canada’s rail logistics system.” A Ministry of Transport spokesperson said, “As CN was not able to meet the minimum volume requirements, the Minister has decided to issue administrative monetary penalties to the company.”

In addition to the grain-specific legislation passed this spring, the federal government passed the Fair Rail Freight Service Act last year to help level the playing field for shippers who had been complaining for years that they were more-or-less at the mercy of CN and CP when it came to shipping prices and quality of shipping service. Shippers were concerned, among other issues, about delivery times, standard of freight cars, and recourse when the two rail giants did not live up to their end of service arrangements.

Some shippers and rail analysts have suggested that the quality of service provided by CN has been decreasing since it was privatized in 1995, as the company has been focusing too much on the bottom line and its stock ratings.


Filed under: Canadian National Railway, Canadian Pacific Railway, CN privatization, shipping oil by rail
Categories: Labor News

Making the Case for the Right to Vote

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Thu, 09/18/2014 - 07:10

September 18, 2014: Petitions signed by more than 12,000 Teamsters are on the way to Judge Loretta Preska calling on her to rule against the Hoffa administration’s bid to end fair elections for International Union officers.

TDU legal counsel, Barbara Harvey, has submitted a letter to the court defending the Right to Vote and asking the Judge to hold a hearing on the issues.

Judge Preska oversees the consent order, a court-approved agreement that guarantees Teamster members the Right to Vote in independently-supervised elections with fair rules. The Hoffa administration is going to court to overturn this agreement.

The Hoffa administration has already pushed through an amendment to the Teamster Constitution that would give them the power to hand-pick the election supervisor and write their own election rules. (See Article III, Section 5(a)(2))

We know what that would look like.

Earlier this year, the Hoffa  administration re-wrote the rules in the middle of the UPS contract vote so they could impose UPS contracts that had been rejected by the members—including a 93 percent No Vote in Louisville.

In an earlier contract vote in the carhaul industry, TDU exposed in federal court that Hoffa’s handpicked election supervisor had certified fraudulent voting results without ever seeing the ballots or voting results let alone supervising the vote count.

The consent order agreement overseen by Judge Preska is the only thing standing in the way of an election with sham rules and a phony election supervisor controlled by Hoffa.

That’s why Hoffa administration attorneys are going to court to try to gut it. And that’s why Teamster members are fighting back.

TDU has always opposed government interference in the union. But we support the consent order’s requirement that Teamster members have the Right to Vote for International Union officers in independently-supervised elections with fair rules.

Teamster members have made their voices heard through the petition drive. TDU and our legal counsel will continue to press the case. 

Issues: Hoffa Watch
Categories: Labor News, Unions

NYC Citi Bike operator agrees to let workers organize into TWU 100

Current News - Thu, 09/18/2014 - 05:35

NYC Citi Bike operator agrees to let workers organize into TWU 100
http://www.amny.com/transit/citi-bike-operator-agrees-to-let-workers-org...
By DAN RIVOLI September 17, 2014

Citi Bike's parent company Alta has agreed to recognize the Transport Workers Union Local 100 as the bike share employees' collective bargaining representative, according to several sources.
The agreement from Alta's board was inked Tuesday evening, sources said, after a federal labor board in August cleared the way for Citi Bike's full-time and regular part-time and seasonal workers at three facilities -- Sunset Park, the Farley Building in midtown and Delancey Street -- to vote to be represented by the TWU, which is the transit workers' union. These employees include bike dispatchers and mechanics, dock technicians and bike rebalancers.
"We're basically underpaid for what we do," said a front line Citi Bike employee who supported unionization and asked to have his name withheld. "If you don't know what you're doing, it could cost the company thousands of dollars."
On top of better wages, employees will have leverage when it comes to negotiating working conditions.
"We'll get the proper equipment and we'll have proper procedures," the employee said.
A spokeswoman for the National Labor Relations Board said yesterday that a union election by Citi Bike workers scheduled for Thursday has been withdrawn.
Citi Bike has 249 employees and 96 of them, or 30% of the workers who will be represented by the TWU, are seasonal, according to the NLRB.
"TWU Local 100 views bike share workers as part of the urban transportation system, bringing mobility, healthy exercise, and environmental responsibility to the mix," the union said.
Alta and its subsidiary NYC Bike Share did not immediately return requests for comment.
The decision comes in the midst of negotiations for a company affiliated with developer Related Cos. to take a controlling stake in Alta so that the bike share system can expand into new neighborhoods.

Categories: Labor News

New Uber, Lyft, Sidecar insurance rules signed into law by Gov. Jerry Brown

Current News - Thu, 09/18/2014 - 04:14

New Uber, Lyft, Sidecar insurance rules signed into law by Gov. Jerry Brown
http://www.mercurynews.com/business/ci_26554062/new-insurance-rules-uber...
By Josh Richmanjrichman@bayareanewsgroup.com
POSTED: 09/17/2014 03:42:11 PM PDT1 COMMENT| UPDATED: ABOUT 12 HOURS AGO

FILE - In this Jan. 17, 2013, file photo, a Lyft car crosses Market Street in San Francisco. (Jeff Chiu/AP Photo)
SACRAMENTO -- Online ride-sharing companies will provide more insurance for drivers under a law signed Wednesday by Gov. Jerry Brown, capping a year of intense wrangling between the nascent industry and lawmakers.

A deal was struck just before the end of the Legislature's session last month on AB2293 by Assemblywoman Susan Bonilla, D-Concord. She issued a statement Wednesday saying it protects consumers but also "represents much more than that."
"This measure symbolizes business flexibility, consumer affordability, political compromise and, most importantly, what true public policy should be -- a collective process for all stakeholders to contribute," Bonilla said.
Ride-sharing companies like Uber, Sidecar and Lyft connect passengers and drivers through smartphone apps, but it's not sharing in the casual carpool sense: The passengers pay the drivers, who are considered independent contractors. The new law will let insurers create new commercial policies for the fast-growing industry, and it specifies that personal policies no longer will cover the drivers' commercial activity starting next July.
From the moment a driver turns on the company's smartphone app, the company must provide $50,000 in liability coverage for death or injury to a single person; $100,000 in coverage for all damages in a single accident; and $30,000 for property damage. In addition, $200,000 of excess liability coverage is required when the driver's personal policy is insufficient. The company then must provide $1 million in coverage once the driver is matched with a passenger.
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An earlier version of the bill required up to $750,000 insurance from the moment the app is turned on. The ride-sharing companies had fought back, arguing that's far more than what's required of taxis -- and for a time in which drivers aren't even on the clock yet.
Armand Feliciano, vice president of the Association of California Insurance Companies, issued a statement Wednesday praising the new law.
"Once again California is leading the way in forging public policy to meet the needs of new innovations," he said, adding that Bonilla and Brown "brought stakeholders together and were able to reach a middle ground that most of the parties, including Uber and Lyft, could support."
The state Senate passed the bill on a 30-4 vote, and the Assembly passed it 67-0.

Josh Richman covers politics. Follow him at Twitter.com/Josh_Richman. Read the Political Blotter at IBAbuzz.com/politics.

Tags: Uberinsurance
Categories: Labor News

SF cabdrivers vote to unionize as industry continues to take beating from ride services

Current News - Thu, 09/18/2014 - 04:08

SF cabdrivers vote to unionize as industry continues to take beating from ride services
http://www.sfexaminer.com/sanfrancisco/sf-cabbies-closer-to-becoming-an-...
• By Jessica Kwong
September 18, 2014
• City taxi drivers could become a recognized union by the AFL-CIO by mid-October. They need more drivers to sign up for the new union and pledge to pay dues.
A new taxi union in San Francisco is well on its way to getting enough members on board to become an official affiliate of the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations.

At the San Francisco Taxi Workers Alliance's meeting on Sept. 9, about 350 cab drivers signed up and paid their dues, and the next day about 40 more joined, leaving the union about 100 paid members away from joining the AFL-CIO network. Union members say the numbers are estimates because they have been receiving pledge forms and payments daily and are backed up in manually entering them into their database.

Based on hundreds more pledge forms from drivers indicating they intend to pay dues, the designation could occur by mid-October, said Beth Powder, a union board member and driver and dispatcher for DeSoto Cab Co. And they're not stopping there. The union's goal is to have 1,000 paid members by December.

"It's promising," she said.

In the meantime, Powder said taxi union members are already finding that some workers from other unions are treating them differently.

"A lot of people have welcomed us into the larger labor family," she said. "People who are part of organized labor have been very warm to us, people in the activism community have been very warm to us and encouraging, saying, 'It's a good thing,' and 'Keep it up.'"

The union is still ironing out what its long-term goals will be, but one issue likely will be a health benefits package for drivers using the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency's driver fund, which has accumulated $3.8 million and grows by $10,100 per month. So far, that fund, formed in 2010, has been untapped. The transit agency has considered putting the funds toward benefits for drivers.

Another long-term goal is legislative work.

"We really need to triangulate with other groups to compel the California Public Utilities Commission to change their designation of transportation network companies," Powder said of ride services such as Uber and Lyft. "They are private citizens using their own vehicles commercially as taxis."

Nazeer Sadiq, 58, a Yellow Cab driver for 21 years, said the union is "critical" for the cab industry's survival this winter, a traditionally low season that he foresees could trim the driver pool by at least 25 percent.

Taxi drivers in The City have long been a disjointed group. Some drivers banded together to form organizations with no official labor union ties such as the United Taxicab Workers and Association, headed by Mark Gruberg, 72, a taxi driver for three decades currently with Green Cab.

Gruberg said his taxi association is "fully supportive" of the union and will eventually fold into it once established.

Retired cab driver John Murnin, who is helping with the cause, said he preferred the union to go with the Teamsters -- which many taxi drivers decades ago were affiliated with -- instead of AFL-CIO, but if the majority preferred the latter, he would support it.

Harbir Batth, 50, a Yellow Cab driver and union founder, admitted that some drivers were hesitant about joining and unsure about whether the labor organization will accomplish anything.

"We have nothing to offer as of now, but we are telling them we need to build up," he said. "We are like a baby trying to crawl and get to our feet."

Tags: SF Cab Driversunionization
Categories: Labor News

Golden Gate Bridge Workers Strike To Protect Their Healthcare And Fight Cost Shifting

Current News - Wed, 09/17/2014 - 21:06

Golden Gate Bridge Workers Strike To Protect Their Healthcare And Fight Cost Shifting
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eRM-bJPooxk
Dozens of Golden Gate Bridge supported a picket line in an unfair
labor strike against the management and board of directors of the
Golden Gate Transit Agency. The management are demanding
concessions including a "Bronze" healthcare plan that would
force cost shifting with workers forced to pay more for their healthcare.
The unfair strike was called by IAM 1414 and was supported by
Ironworkers, ILWU IBU Bay Area, IFPTE 21, LIUNA laborers, IBT Local 665 and IBEW Local 6 electricians. It took place on September 16, 2014. Bus lines and ferry boat workers continued to work.
For more video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=18g9gbrBjG0
http://youtu.be/o9ZdijbTSMA
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E8_5xCxmPvI&feature=
For more information:
www.goldengatelabor.com
Production of Labor Video Project www.laborvideo.org

Tags: Golden Gate WorkersstrikeILWU IBU Bay Area
Categories: Labor News

Cambodia: Police Release Unionists After 3,000 Workers Surround District Office

Labourstart.org News - Wed, 09/17/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: The Daily
Categories: Labor News

Cambodia: Global Day of Action for Cambodian garment workers - interview with Jyrki Raina

Labourstart.org News - Wed, 09/17/2014 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Radio Labour
Categories: Labor News

Golden Gate Bridge Workers Strike To Protect Their Healthcare And Fight Cost Shifting

Current News - Wed, 09/17/2014 - 15:34

Golden Gate Bridge Workers Strike To Protect Their Healthcare And Fight Cost Shifting
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eRM-bJPooxk
Dozens of Golden Gate Bridge supported a picket line in an unfair
labor strike against the management and board of directors of the
Golden Gate Transit Agency. The management are demanding
concessions including a "Bronze" healthcare plan that would
force cost shifting with workers forced to pay more for their healthcare.
The unfair strike was called by IAM 1414 and was supported by
Ironworkers, ILWU IBU Bay Area, IFPTE 21, LIUNA laborers, IBT Local 665 and IBEW Local 6 electricians. It took place on September 16, 2014. Bus lines and ferry boat workers continued to work.
For more video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=18g9gbrBjG0
http://youtu.be/o9ZdijbTSMA
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E8_5xCxmPvI&feature=
For more information:
www.goldengatelabor.com
Production of Labor Video Project www.laborvideo.org

Tags: ILWU IBU Bay Areastrike
Categories: Labor News

UBER DRIVERS PROTEST: 'You Can't Make A Living Working Only For Uber'

Current News - Wed, 09/17/2014 - 15:33

UBER DRIVERS PROTEST: 'You Can't Make A Living Working Only For Uber'
http://www.businessinsider.com/uber-new-york-city-office-protests-2014-9
• MAYA KOSOFF
• SEP. 15, 2014, 4:26 PM

Maya Kosoff/Business Insider

On Monday morning, a group of New York City-based Uber drivers protested the company outside of its Long Island City, Queens office.

The protest was planned by a group of drivers known as the Uber Drivers Network NYC. The group's first protest happened last Monday at Uber's offices. The disgruntled drivers have been protesting against Uber policies.

Last week, Uber reversed a policy that made its Black Car and SUV drivers pick up less-lucrative Uber XL and Uber X customers. But drivers are still unhappy.

A group of about 60 protesters showed up around 10 a.m. on Monday for the protest, carrying signs and a megaphone. "I've been driving for Uber for two years, and when I started, I loved it," Uber driver Numan Tarik told Business Insider at the protest.

Maya Kosoff/Business Insider

Tarik says Uber's steep discounts, intended to give the company a competitive edge over competitors like Lyft and Gett, as well as yellow cabs, are hurting Uber drivers.

"Uber is charging us [drivers] 20% before they deduct New York sales tax. We have to get car washes daily, we get our cars detailed once a month, we get regular oil changes and pay for insurance." Tarik said. According to Uber, these are just suggestions for its drivers, and not a company policy. Tarik also drives for competing car companies. "You can't make a living working only for Uber."

Protesters carried signs saying "Uber X should not be cheaper than a taxi" and "Uber: the most valuable asset is the drivers."

Maya Kosoff/Business Insider
NYPD officers brought in barricades to contain protesters.

The New York City Police Department also showed up for the protest. About six NYPD vehicles and a dozen officers were there to monitor the protest. NYPD blocked off access to 42 Road and monitored traffic on Jackson Avenue in front of Uber's offices.

Oris Fortuna has been an Uber X driver for four months. He told Business Insider he quit his old job because he thought Uber would be a more lucrative way to make money.

"Since Uber implemented the 20% off discount on all Uber rides, I've been losing $200 a week," Fortuna said. "To make up for it, you have to work 20% more. That means more mileage and more gas. An $8 trip is not worth it." Fortuna wants better representation for himself and other Uber drivers. "There's no union representing us, so we have to protest."

Maya Kosoff/Business Insider

Uber NYC's general manager Josh Mohrer was at the protest as well.

"We have, and have always had, an open-door policy with our drivers," Mohrer told Business Insider. "The majority of our drivers communicate with us. We're always happy to welcome them and talk to them."

Mohrer spoke to the journalists who had showed up to cover the protest, though he and the protesting Uber drivers didn't communicate.

The group has been planning its protests and meetings largely via Facebook. On Friday, the drivers held a meeting in Queens' Forest Park to meet face-to-face for the first time. Roughly 100 drivers showed up for the informational meeting, which started at 4 pm and went until 7:30, with Uber drivers individually voicing their concerns about the company.

"Uber wants us to have all these amenities — water bottles, mints for our customers — but they're cutting the prices. So how can I, as a professional driver, provide all of this?" asked Ajit Singh at Friday's meeting.

The Uber Drivers Network NYC group plans to continue protesting Uber at its offices.

Hilal Aissani, an Uber SUV driver, is unhappy with Uber because of what it tells customers about tipping their drivers. "Uber tells the customer that their tip for the driver is included, but it isn't," Aissani said at Monday's protest. "Drivers never see a dollar of that tip money." A blog post on Uber's website says that by default, 20% of the customer's fare is paid to the driver as a gratuity. This is the case for UberTAXI only, a feature allowing Uber customers to request a regular taxi through the app in some cities. According to its website, Uber says there is no need to tip with UberBLACK or UberX.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/uber-new-york-city-office-protests-2014-9...

Tags: Uber Driver Protest
Categories: Labor News

Taxi worker unions respond to rise in taxi app companies

ITF - Wed, 09/17/2014 - 09:54
ITF affiliates from the United States, Canada, India and Europe who are involved in organising taxi workers met in Brussels on 15-16 September to agree responses to the growth of taxi app companies.
Categories: Union Federations

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