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JFK Airport guard forced to watch colleagues have sex on security cameras: suit

Current News - Wed, 10/11/2017 - 10:29

JFK Airport guard forced to watch colleagues have sex on security cameras: suit

BY
VICTORIA BEKIEMPIS
NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
Updated: Tuesday, October 10, 2017, 11:54 PM

JFK Airport guard forced to watch colleagues have sex on security cameras: suit

http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/jfk-airport-guard-forced-watch-colle...

A former security guard at Kennedy Airport was forced to watch her coworkers have sex and subjected to constant sexual harassment because she rejected her boss’s advances, a new lawsuit alleges.

LaDonna Powell, 32, worked for the company now known as Allied Universal Security Services at JFK from 2012 to 2016.

Powell says she was “presented with a choice: have sex with male supervisors and get ahead, or refuse and be relentlessly harassed and retaliated against,” her Manhattan Federal Court lawsuit alleges.

Because Powell refused, she endured “harrowing” torment, she claims in the suit, which was filed Tuesday.

That torment included being “repeatedly forced to stand by as her supervisors watched her colleagues have sex in security booths via closed circuit television cameras,” according to court papers.

She was also “present while her supervisors watched videos of female security guards performing oral sex on male supervisors” and would ask about her sexual prowess, court papers state.

Once, in late 2014, a boss called Powell into his office and allegedly said "How much further do you want to go (at Allied)? ... There are things you can do to get where you want to go."

LaDonna Powell, 32, accuses Allied Universal Security Services at JFK of quid-pro-quo sex for advancement.
LaDonna Powell, 32, accuses Allied Universal Security Services at JFK of quid-pro-quo sex for advancement.(WNBC)
His “clear implication to Ms. Powell was that she could engage in sex acts to advance her career,” the suit states.

A supervisor from the Port Authority — which contracts with Allied to provide security at JFK — was there during the meeting, the Powell alleges.

Another time, the same Allied supervisor said “Since everyone already thinks we had sex, let's bend you over the table,” the documents claim.

The same man also "brushed up against Ms. Powell's body when walking past her and made unnecessary contact with her,” according to the lawsuit.

When Powell tried to report the harassment — and an allegation that a female colleague was raped by two coworkers after a work event — her complaints fell on deaf ears, she contends.

Powell, who is black, also alleges that white supervisors routinely used the N-word in the office in front of her.

NYC PAPERS OUT. Social media use restricted to low res file max 184 x 128 pixels and 72 dpi
A former security guard at Kennedy Airport claims in a new lawsuit she was subjected to constant sexual harassment. (ANTHONY DELMUNDO/NEW YORK DAILY NEWS)
She says she was often denied meal and bathroom breaks when she worked as a security officer "to the point where, on multiple occasions, she had to urinate in a cup in the middle of her shift.”

Powell claims she made multiple complaints to Allied supervisors and the Port Authority about the alleged racial and sex discrimination at JFK.

She believes she was fired in May 2016 as retaliation and is seeking unspecified damages.

"We have just received the lawsuit and are reviewing it," Allied said in a statement, saying that "per policy we do not comment publicly on pending litigation."

Port Authority spokesman Steve Coleman declined to comment on the suit, but said the matter was referred to the agency's inspector general.

WITH DAN RIVOLI

Tags: Sexual HarassmentKennedy Airport
Categories: Labor News

Indonesia: ICTSI faces labour violations claim

Labourstart.org News - Tue, 10/10/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Port Strategy
Categories: Labor News

Maritime's Wall

IBU - Tue, 10/10/2017 - 14:54
The Jones Act And Homeland Security In The 21st Century For nearly a century, the Jones Act has protected the U.S.
Categories: Unions

IBU's Number 1 Enemy!

IBU - Tue, 10/10/2017 - 09:54
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Categories: Unions

Ireland: Ryanair chaos turns tables on workers' rights

Labourstart.org News - Mon, 10/09/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Deutsche Welle
Categories: Labor News

Kazakhstan: Court rejects union leader’s appeal for justice

Labourstart.org News - Mon, 10/09/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: IndustriALL
Categories: Labor News

Indonesia: ITF committed to ensuring ICTSI does not extend its emerging patterns of labour violations

Labourstart.org News - Mon, 10/09/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: ITF Global Union
Categories: Labor News

Iran: Imprisoned Teachers’ Rights Advocate Esmail Abdi Denied Sentence Review

Labourstart.org News - Mon, 10/09/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: CHRI
Categories: Labor News

MTA, NY TWU 100 mull ditching subway booth workers for ‘ambassadors’ to boost communication with riders “They just want to combine both, where they work the platform and they also work on the other side of the turnstile,” said Kia Phua, the union’s vic

Current News - Mon, 10/09/2017 - 12:48

MTA, transit union mull ditching subway booth workers for ‘ambassadors’ to boost communication with riders
“They just want to combine both, where they work the platform and they also work on the other side of the turnstile,” said Kia Phua, the union’s vice president of rapid transit operations. “It is a job cut.”

BY
DAN RIVOLI
NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
Monday, October 9, 2017, 4:00 AM
The subway station clerk soon may go the way of the token.

In what could be the beginning of the end for booth-dwelling workers, the MTA is in negotiations with the transit union to create a new title, “customer service ambassador,” with new duties, the Daily News has learned.

Ambassadors will roam stations and aid riders, in effect offering concierge services befitting the subway.

“These ambassadors will improve communication with riders by providing real-time information about the system and their commutes,” Metropolitan Transportation Authority spokesman Shams Tarek said.

It’s all part of improving customer service, Tarek said, which is key to MTA chairman Joe Lhota’s Subway Action Plan.

As they did back when riders used tokens, station agents still handle MetroCard transactions and take questions and complaints from tourists and New Yorkers alike. But in anticipation of the day when the MetroCard is retired for smart card and phone payments, and fewer people line up at booths, the MTA and the union representing transit workers have tried to negotiate new responsibilities for station agents.

Riders got their first glimpse of the new subway ambassadors at the reopening of the 53rd St. stop on the R line in Brooklyn, following the station’s six-month makeover. The workers were handing out flyers detailing the station renovations and new artwork.

MTA workers in yellow and black shirts labeled with “Customer Service Ambassador” (pictured) greeted riders after the reopening of the R train in Brooklyn in Sept. 2017. (KEVIN C. DOWNS/FOR NEW YORK DAILY NEWS)
Commuter Will O’Connor, 42, thinks having roving workers makes more sense than the booths. He said he never goes to a booth anymore and thinks their locations are inconvenient when he needs help.

Gov. Cuomo orders panel to bust NYC gridlock, bring money to MTA

“I’ve tried to bark information to one of those booths through the turnstile,” the tech worker from Carroll Gardens said of one fruitless effort to figure out when his next train would show up.

Jean-Claude Quintyne, 25, from Crown Heights, thought it would help make his commute smoother, particularly when he’s at the busy Atlantic Ave.-Barclays Center station. The ambassador concept, Quintyne said, is a sign that the MTA is “moving to improve things, instead of trying to empty our pockets.”

Not everyone is thrilled with the plan.

Some representatives of Transport Workers Union Local 100 say the MTA is trying to cut its work force by merging the role of station agent and platform controller – who are train conductors assigned to thin crowds at stations – into a single title.

Tags: TWU 100layoffs
Categories: Labor News

MTA, NY TWU 100 mull ditching subway booth workers for ‘ambassadors’ to boost communication with riders “They just want to combine both, where they work the platform and they also work on the other side of the turnstile,” said Kia Phua, the union’s vic

Current News - Mon, 10/09/2017 - 12:48

MTA, transit union mull ditching subway booth workers for ‘ambassadors’ to boost communication with riders
“They just want to combine both, where they work the platform and they also work on the other side of the turnstile,” said Kia Phua, the union’s vice president of rapid transit operations. “It is a job cut.”

BY
DAN RIVOLI
NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
Monday, October 9, 2017, 4:00 AM
The subway station clerk soon may go the way of the token.

In what could be the beginning of the end for booth-dwelling workers, the MTA is in negotiations with the transit union to create a new title, “customer service ambassador,” with new duties, the Daily News has learned.

Ambassadors will roam stations and aid riders, in effect offering concierge services befitting the subway.

“These ambassadors will improve communication with riders by providing real-time information about the system and their commutes,” Metropolitan Transportation Authority spokesman Shams Tarek said.

It’s all part of improving customer service, Tarek said, which is key to MTA chairman Joe Lhota’s Subway Action Plan.

As they did back when riders used tokens, station agents still handle MetroCard transactions and take questions and complaints from tourists and New Yorkers alike. But in anticipation of the day when the MetroCard is retired for smart card and phone payments, and fewer people line up at booths, the MTA and the union representing transit workers have tried to negotiate new responsibilities for station agents.

Riders got their first glimpse of the new subway ambassadors at the reopening of the 53rd St. stop on the R line in Brooklyn, following the station’s six-month makeover. The workers were handing out flyers detailing the station renovations and new artwork.

MTA workers in yellow and black shirts labeled with “Customer Service Ambassador” (pictured) greeted riders after the reopening of the R train in Brooklyn in Sept. 2017. (KEVIN C. DOWNS/FOR NEW YORK DAILY NEWS)
Commuter Will O’Connor, 42, thinks having roving workers makes more sense than the booths. He said he never goes to a booth anymore and thinks their locations are inconvenient when he needs help.

Gov. Cuomo orders panel to bust NYC gridlock, bring money to MTA

“I’ve tried to bark information to one of those booths through the turnstile,” the tech worker from Carroll Gardens said of one fruitless effort to figure out when his next train would show up.

Jean-Claude Quintyne, 25, from Crown Heights, thought it would help make his commute smoother, particularly when he’s at the busy Atlantic Ave.-Barclays Center station. The ambassador concept, Quintyne said, is a sign that the MTA is “moving to improve things, instead of trying to empty our pockets.”

Not everyone is thrilled with the plan.

Some representatives of Transport Workers Union Local 100 say the MTA is trying to cut its work force by merging the role of station agent and platform controller – who are train conductors assigned to thin crowds at stations – into a single title.

Tags: TWU 100layoffs
Categories: Labor News

UK: How Uber Stalled in London

Labourstart.org News - Sat, 10/07/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: NYRB
Categories: Labor News

Puerto Rico: Teamsters Denounce False Reports of Work Stoppage by Union Drivers

Labourstart.org News - Sat, 10/07/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Teamsters
Categories: Labor News

State agency slaps BART with a nearly $220,000 fine for 2013 worker deaths; blames management, safety culture but no one is prosecuted and goes to jail

Current News - Fri, 10/06/2017 - 20:57

State agency slaps BART with a nearly $220,000 fine for 2013 worker deaths; blames management, safety culture but no one is prosecuted and goes to jail
State agency slaps BART with a nearly $220,000 fine for 2013 worker deaths; blames top management, safety culture

http://www.eastbaytimes.com/2017/10/06/state-finds-bart-management-safet...

BART employees, along with the National Transportation Safety Board investigate the scene on Sunday, Oct. 20, 2013, where a four-car northbound Bay Point train was involved in the deaths of two workers in Walnut Creek, Calif. (File photo by Susan Tripp Pollard/Bay Area News Group Archives)
By ERIN BALDASSARI | ebaldassari@bayareanewsgroup.com | Bay Area News Group
PUBLISHED: October 6, 2017 at 1:53 pm | UPDATED: October 6, 2017 at 4:53 pm
A state regulatory agency is slapping a nearly $220,000 fine on BART after concluding that its top management and safety culture were to blame for the deaths of two workers during the 2013 labor strikes.

The decision comes nearly four years to the day after a BART train, operated by a trainee with no direct supervision, struck and killed BART employee Christopher Sheppard, 58, of Hayward, and a contractor, 66-year-old Fair Oaks resident Laurence Daniels. The California Public Utilities Commission launched its investigation last year into the workers’ deaths, following investigations from other state and federal agencies.

It’s the second fine levied against BART for the incident, though BART is still appealing the first penalty it received in 2014 from the California Division of Occupational Safety and Health (Cal-OSHA). That agency in July downgraded its initial penalty of $210,000 to just $95,000, which BART is asking Cal-OSHA to reconsider. And, in October, BART agreed to pay $300,000 to settle a wrongful death suit brought by Daniels’ family.

The decision, from the presiding officer in the investigation, Administrative Law Judge Kimberly Kim, describes the violations as a “breach of commitment” from top managers to enforce safety standards in their departments. Kim’s decision will become final in 30 days, unless the full commission decides it warrants review, or if BART files an appeal, according to a commission spokesman.

“These are serious and egregious violations, particularly in view of the fact that they were violations committed by BART’s top level veteran managers, reflecting BART’s organizational and management culture and attitudes,” the decision reads.

In a statement Friday, BART spokeswoman Alicia Trost said the agency was still determining whether it would appeal the decision. In the past, it has denied its safety culture was to blame, citing instead the failure of the workers to follow its policies for working near the tracks, as well as the unusual circumstances surrounding the 2013 strikes, when managers were performing essential tasks and the agency was preparing to offer limited service from the East Bay to San Francisco.

In a formal response to the commission, BART contended that the supervisor in charge of overseeing the trainee was an experienced and qualified train operator. But the commission’s investigation revealed the supervisor was not in the cabin with the trainee at the time and had been using his cellphone throughout the day, a possible violation of both state regulations and BART’s own policies.

The supervisor sent or received 47 text messages and logged 11 calls between 6 a.m. and the time of collision, 1:44 p.m., on Oct. 19, 2013, including one text message sent just one minute before the men were struck by the train, the commission’s investigation found.

It took just 4.7 seconds from the moment the operator in training saw Daniels and Sheppard, who were out inspecting a dip in the tracks near the Walnut Creek station, and the time of impact. The inexperienced operator slammed on the emergency brake and tried to sound the train’s horns to alert the workers but hit the door control button instead, according to the commission’s investigation.

Two state investigations and an investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board also cited the inherent danger in a workplace procedure BART was employing at the time, called “simple approval.” That policy allowed workers to operate within a certain distance of the tracks and made workers responsible for their own safety.

Under the procedure, the workers should have designated a member of their team to watch for passing trains, but that didn’t happen the day Daniels and Sheppard were killed.

BART acted quickly to eliminate the procedure, and the agency now requires all workers to request a “work area clearance,” a more stringent policy that prevents trains from entering areas where workers are present. The agency also requires three-way communication among workers, the train control center and train operators and reduced speeds near work zones. And it has invested $4 million in physical safety barriers, among other changes that resulted from the workers’ deaths.

“Safety is our highest priority,” Trost said Friday. “There is nothing more important than providing a safe working environment for our employees.”

But, as part of the decision, the commission is requiring even more stringent action during a three-year probationary period, mandating BART immediately begin tracking and submitting annual reports of any violations of safety rules, practices, policies or procedures, along with the corrective action taken as a result of those violations. The agency must re-evaluate its current safety training programs and design a plan to improve their effectiveness.

The agency must also develop and implement “annual safety rules, practices, policies, procedures and culture refresher courses for all of its essential managers” and brief the commission annually on its efforts. The commission will monitor BART’s compliance during the probationary period, after which the commission could issue more penalties if BART violates the order or extend the probationary period, according to the decision.

Hearing officer recommends $220,000 fine for BART in 2013 deaths
http://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/article/PUC-judge-recommends-220-000-...

By Bob EgelkoOctober 6, 2017 Updated: October 6, 2017 7:25pm
BART should be fined $220,000 and overhaul lax safety rules and practices that contributed to the deaths of two workers on a track near Walnut Creek in 2013, a state hearing officer recommended Friday.

“The evidence in this case shows that there may be a serious safety culture problem at BART,” said Kimberly Kim, an administrative law judge for the state Public Utilities Commission.

Christopher Sheppard, 58, of Hayward, a BART track engineer, and Lawrence Daniels, 66, of Fair Oaks (Sacramento County), a contract employee, were fatally struck by a train in October 2013 while they were checking on a reported dip in the tracks between the Walnut Creek and Pleasant Hill stations.

The accident happened on the second day of a strike by union employees that lasted four days. The train, traveling at 60 to 70 mph, was being operated by a manager who was being trained to take over driver duties in the event of an extended walkout.

At the time, BART trains did not slow down during routine track maintenance, and workers were supposed to look out for their own safety. A coroner’s report found that neither of the workers had been acting as a lookout for oncoming trains.

State regulators with Cal/OSHA found the practice unsafe in 2014 and fined BART $210,000. The district has also settled a suit by Daniels’ family for $300,000. BART has since changed its policy.

Kim found numerous safety violations in Friday’s decision. She said a veteran BART manager, Paul Liston, who was supposed to be training and supervising the operator, instead had been on his cell phone for hours, including the moments before the accident. Five “top-level managers” on the train did nothing to stop him, Kim said.

She said neither Liston nor the train operator, Richard Burr, sounded the horn as they approached the work site, and other managers failed to warn them of the presence of track workers. Kim also said BART was supposed to investigate the accident and file its report with the Public Utilities Commission within 60 days, but did not submit its report until January 2017.

Kim said the violations warranted $659,000 in fines, but recommended that BART pay only one-third of that amount while upgrading its practices. She said the transit district, within six months, should propose improvements to its safety training programs and require managers to undergo at least 40 hours of training, with the PUC monitoring its compliance.

BART or a PUC member can seek review of Kim’s decision by the full commission. BART spokeswoman Alicia Trost said the district is reviewing the decision.

After the 2013 accident, Trost said in a statement, “BART moved swiftly to implement profound changes to its trackside procedures.”

Bob Egelko is a San Francisco Chronicle staff writer. Email: begelko@sfchronicle.comTwitter:@egelko

Tags: BART Murderosharailways
Categories: Labor News

Fleet Memo for September 30 2017

IBU - Fri, 10/06/2017 - 11:07
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Categories: Unions

IBT Pres Hoffa Wants Trump To Make Corporate Trade Agreement NAFTA Better?

Current News - Fri, 10/06/2017 - 05:40

IBT Pres Hoffa Wants Trump To Make Corporate Trade Agreement NAFTA Better?
http://www.detroitnews.com/story/opinion/2017/10/04/labor-voices-nafta-t...
NAFTA should deal with trucking, labor
James HoffaPublished 12:03 a.m. ET Oct. 4, 2017
As governments continue to grapple with much-needed changes to the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), U.S. and Canadian Teamsters have joined together to stand up for workers and push for policy changes that will improve their lives and livelihoods.

While the third round of renegotiations of the trade pact ended last week, the status of many important issues remains in flux, including workers’ rights and cross-border trucking. The Teamsters have also joined civil society groups in calling for the elimination of a controversial dispute settlement mechanism in NAFTA’s investment chapter that allows corporations to sue governments.

At the top of the agenda is fixing the mistake of including long-haul trucking in the original NAFTA. The Teamsters have briefed U.S. and Canadian officials on suggested language that would provide a level playing field, improve truck safety and boost working conditions and wages for Mexican drivers.

This issue must be addressed in these negotiations. Not only do truckers stand to benefit, but American lives are at stake. Old and unsafe trucks put our highways at risk and pollute our air, putting the public’s health in jeopardy. That’s not a price people should pay for bad policy.

The first draft of the proposed U.S. labor chapter, which was tabled last week, is inadequate. As it stands, working and middle class families are better served by the current Canadian proposal, which will improve wages and working conditions in all three NAFTA countries and calls for an end to anti-worker right-to-work laws here.

It is imperative that NAFTA 2.0 gets it right when it comes to workers’ rights. The pact in its current form doesn’t work. Instead, it subordinates their interests to the bottom-line profit motives of multinational corporations, suppresses wages and labor standards, and contributes to rising inequality.

Michigan has seen firsthand the terrible damage trade deals like NAFTA have brought to this country. More than 161,000 Michigan workers have lost their jobs to offshoring, while 300,000 more manufacturing jobs have been lost since the deal took effect. Members of the UAW’s Local 600 in Dearborn were particularly hard-hit. It is estimated NAFTA has cost the U.S. more than a million jobs. That is unacceptable. It is time to replace NAFTA with a new model of trade that puts the interests of North American workers above those of multinational corporations and foreign investors.

Negotiators head back to Washington to continue talks next week, and there is a lot at stake. It is essential that workers’ interests take precedence over the desires of big business, which is merely looking to further boost their bottom lines over making policy changes that put people first. That’s what real change would look like.

The Teamsters are North America’s supply chain union. With members in long-haul trucking and freight rail, air, at ports and in warehouses, as well as members in manufacturing and food processing, this union has a big stake in trade policy reform. We will be monitoring the modernization of a flawed and failed NAFTA, and fighting to make sure that the new NAFTA works for working families.

James Hoffa is president of the Teamsters.

Tags: Hoffaderegulationunion bustingNAFTA
Categories: Labor News

IBT Pres Hoffa Wants Trump To Make Corporate Trade Agreement NAFTA Better?

Current News - Fri, 10/06/2017 - 05:40

IBT Pres Hoffa Wants Trump To Make Corporate Trade Agreement NAFTA Better?
http://www.detroitnews.com/story/opinion/2017/10/04/labor-voices-nafta-t...
NAFTA should deal with trucking, labor
James HoffaPublished 12:03 a.m. ET Oct. 4, 2017
As governments continue to grapple with much-needed changes to the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), U.S. and Canadian Teamsters have joined together to stand up for workers and push for policy changes that will improve their lives and livelihoods.

While the third round of renegotiations of the trade pact ended last week, the status of many important issues remains in flux, including workers’ rights and cross-border trucking. The Teamsters have also joined civil society groups in calling for the elimination of a controversial dispute settlement mechanism in NAFTA’s investment chapter that allows corporations to sue governments.

At the top of the agenda is fixing the mistake of including long-haul trucking in the original NAFTA. The Teamsters have briefed U.S. and Canadian officials on suggested language that would provide a level playing field, improve truck safety and boost working conditions and wages for Mexican drivers.

This issue must be addressed in these negotiations. Not only do truckers stand to benefit, but American lives are at stake. Old and unsafe trucks put our highways at risk and pollute our air, putting the public’s health in jeopardy. That’s not a price people should pay for bad policy.

The first draft of the proposed U.S. labor chapter, which was tabled last week, is inadequate. As it stands, working and middle class families are better served by the current Canadian proposal, which will improve wages and working conditions in all three NAFTA countries and calls for an end to anti-worker right-to-work laws here.

It is imperative that NAFTA 2.0 gets it right when it comes to workers’ rights. The pact in its current form doesn’t work. Instead, it subordinates their interests to the bottom-line profit motives of multinational corporations, suppresses wages and labor standards, and contributes to rising inequality.

Michigan has seen firsthand the terrible damage trade deals like NAFTA have brought to this country. More than 161,000 Michigan workers have lost their jobs to offshoring, while 300,000 more manufacturing jobs have been lost since the deal took effect. Members of the UAW’s Local 600 in Dearborn were particularly hard-hit. It is estimated NAFTA has cost the U.S. more than a million jobs. That is unacceptable. It is time to replace NAFTA with a new model of trade that puts the interests of North American workers above those of multinational corporations and foreign investors.

Negotiators head back to Washington to continue talks next week, and there is a lot at stake. It is essential that workers’ interests take precedence over the desires of big business, which is merely looking to further boost their bottom lines over making policy changes that put people first. That’s what real change would look like.

The Teamsters are North America’s supply chain union. With members in long-haul trucking and freight rail, air, at ports and in warehouses, as well as members in manufacturing and food processing, this union has a big stake in trade policy reform. We will be monitoring the modernization of a flawed and failed NAFTA, and fighting to make sure that the new NAFTA works for working families.

James Hoffa is president of the Teamsters.

Tags: Hoffaderegulationunion bustingNAFTA
Categories: Labor News

Global: World Teachers Day is celebrated in every corner of the world

Labourstart.org News - Thu, 10/05/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Education International
Categories: Labor News

Indonesia: ITF fights back against ICTSI victimisation

Labourstart.org News - Thu, 10/05/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: ITF
Categories: Labor News

France: Macron accused of 'class contempt' after jibe at protesting workers

Labourstart.org News - Thu, 10/05/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Guardian
Categories: Labor News

Belarus: Trade union leader freed

Labourstart.org News - Wed, 10/04/2017 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: IndustriALL
Categories: Labor News

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