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Young dockworkers in London

ILWU - Tue, 02/27/2018 - 12:32

The Antwerp Dockers’ BTB Youth Movement with ILWU International Vice President Ray Familathe & ILWU Young Workers from the United States and Canada.

“Good people share and aren’t scared about letting other people have a go,” Paddy Crumlin told a room full of International delegates in London this November. Crumlin is President of the International Transport Workers Federation (ITF), and he welcomed dozens of youth delegates to participate in the ITF Dockers Section meetings in London on November 14th-17th.

A day earlier, I joined 30 young dockworkers from 16 countries who attended the ITF Youth Dockers Section meeting, which helped us prepare for the following days when youth delegates observed and sat with representatives from many of the world’s dockworker unions as they conducted business.

I had the honor of representing the Local 23 Young Workers Committee and was part of an ILWU delegation that included International Vice President (Mainland) Ray Familathe, ILWU Canada President Rob Ashton, Local 502 youth delegates Ashley Bordignon and Dan Kask, Local 400 member and Canadian area ITF Coordinator Peter Lahay, Local 63 members Joe Gasperov, and Robert Abordo, and Kelly Dondero from the brand new Local 63 Superintendents Unit.

The ITF leadership understands that the new generation of workers have to participate in decisions because we will be most affected by automation and other changes in our workplaces. Dan Kask and I were invited to give a presentation about the work we have been doing to build a young workers movement in our union. We shared successes and lessons learned from ILWU Canada and Local 23. We discussed ideas and showed pictures of young workers volunteering in local communities, participating in conferences, leading peer-to-peer education events, marching in the streets and standing with other workers on their picket lines. We provided examples of how to use social media effectively and how to take stock of our individual skills and put them to work building the union.

The ITF leadership tasked the youth delegates with building a global framework for the ITF’s Youth Movement. We elected chairs, set up a strategy for navigating languages and regions using email and social media, and gave ourselves six months for each of our affiliated unions to start a Young Workers Committee with an internet presence. The Maritime Union of Australia (MUA), the ILWU and now the Antwerp Dockers (Belgische Transport Bond – BTB) have all developed strong local young workers committees. In the coming months will help dockers from Spain, Colombia, Nicaragua, Turkey, Sri Lanka, Senegal and other countries develop their own committees. If we can build local capacity for action and participation in our affiliated unions, it helps build the capacity of the ITF to carry out global campaigns.

The ITF targets major port terminal operators with global campaigns

We learned about the United Nations “Global Compact” – a list of 10 principles that have been voluntarily adopted by 10,000 corporations around the world. The principles include the abolition of child labor, slavery, discrimination in the workplace and the right to free association and collective bargaining for workers.

We noted that only one global terminal operator has signed: APMT. I was moved by the words of ITF Dockers Assistant Secretary Nigel Venes, who said, “Employers have two faces and behave one way in the developed world and another in the developing world. We have to move through our industry and change these bandit employers.”

ILWU Local 502 Casual, Ashley Bordignon, gives a presentation to the ITF Young Dockers meeting in London. In September she was elected by her peers to ILWU Canada’s Young Workers Committee.

Strong women’s agenda

The ITF Women’s Conference took place in Marrakesh, Morocco, a week before our Dockers Section meeting. The Dockers Section approved a request to formalize a Women’s Working Group. This group will monitor women’s membership in the ITF, build networks to exchange experiences and best practices, and continue supporting ITF campaigns – including global initiatives to end workplace violence.

Other issues of concern on the ITF Women’s agenda include recruitment, safety, political action, equal pay, training, promotion and equal facilities.

November 19th was “World Toilet Day.” The ITF took the opportunity to launch a campaign, demanding separate and secure women’s facilities at port terminals around the world. I had to admit that this was a problem I had never considered and understood until now. Ports remain male-dominated workplaces. Part of normalizing women in our workplace is fighting for equal treatment and equal conditions.

Key issues remain

Health and safety, automation and respect for collective bargaining rights remain the most pressing issues across our industry. Too many terminal operators gallivant across North America, Western Europe and Australia, masquerading as safety conscious, ethical employers, when the reality is far different. Consider the example of DP

World’s terminal in Constanta, Romania, which has not reported a single injury in three years. We know that injuries and near-misses are not always properly handled and recorded in our own workplaces, and the situation is much worse outside of the developed world – and made worse everywhere due to poor terminal management.

In locations where “de-reguulation” or non-enforcement are the norm, employers have no reason to comply with any rules. In places like Africa, India and the Arab World, workplace monitoring is a preposterous farce. Lashing remains the most dangerous job, often performed by temporary workers who face death and serious injuries – along with constant threats to keep quiet. In Latin America, trade unionists are regularly assassinated, “disappeared.”

They and their families live under constant threats of violence and terrorism. Many of us know the story of Guatemalan trade union leader Pedro Zamora, who was gunned down in 2007 in front of his two children for resisting the privatization of a port in the Central American country. He was a leader of the Sindicato de Trabajadores Empresa Portuaria Quetzal (STEPQ), the Guatemalan dockers union. Three months ago, the current president of STEPQ received a message that if the union didn’t back off, they would mail him the ear of his 13-yearold daughter.

Where conditions are the worst, it is not just the lack of strong trade unions, but specifically what those unions represent, workers having a voice in their workplace. Having a voice on the job about safety and health is paramount to raising standards. To do that, workers must have laws that are enforced guaranteeing the right to form unions and to associate freely without threats and violence. Every gain that has been made in this arena has been won through workers struggle.

Conclusions

The ITF is changing by involving more women and young workers into the organization. The organization recognizes that young people have the least security, lowest wages and greatest vulnerability to layoffs and automation. It recognizes that women are the most vulnerable to workplace violence, discrimination and inequality.

And they understand that women and young people will bring vital new energy, new solutions, vision and creativity to our movement. Paddy Crumlin told the youth delegates that we have a responsibility to get involved with the ITF, just as the organization has a responsibility to include us.

If we can involve more young people and instill them with a sense of purpose, and possibility, then we will ensure that future generations will be in a better position to hold employers accountable and support struggles to raise standards for workers across our industry and around the world.

Brian Skiffington

Categories: Unions

Portugal: Thousands of postal workers strike to renationalise the CTT

Labourstart.org News - Mon, 02/26/2018 - 16:00
LabourStart headline - Source: UNI Global Union
Categories: Labor News

France: Emmanuel Macron takes on unions to cut rail workers’ rights

Labourstart.org News - Mon, 02/26/2018 - 16:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Guardian
Categories: Labor News

Emmanuel Macron takes on unions to cut French rail workers’ rights

Current News - Mon, 02/26/2018 - 10:26

Emmanuel Macron takes on unions to cut French rail workers’ rights
Strike action being discussed after reforms unveiled by French prime minister Édouard Philippe
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/feb/26/emmanuel-macron-takes-on-f...
Angelique Chrisafis in Paris
@achrisafis
Mon 26 Feb 2018 11.59 EST

SNCF has debts of more than €45bn and must ready itself for incoming EU competition rules. Photograph: Ludovic Marin/AFP/Getty Images
Emmanuel Macron is to push through sweeping reforms to France’s vast state rail system and cut rail workers’ special employment rights – tackling one of France’s riskiest political issues.

Any question of overhauling the SNCF state railway company has always proved controversial, with the train network grinding to a virtual halt for weeks when trade unions opposed changes to rail staff’s benefits in 1995.

But the French prime minister, Édouard Philippe, said that the government would quickly push through changes by special executive decree without a vote in parliament if necessary. Trade unions are discussing possible strikes on 12 March and will join bigger public sector strikes on 22 March.

Unlike Britain, where rail services were privatised in the 1990s, the SNCF remains state-run and is seen as a national treasure. But, although the train network has been rated among the best in Europe in terms of speed, quality and price, urban commuters and regional passengers increasingly complain of overcrowding, inefficiency, delays and problems.

The main issue for Macron is that the French state rail operator is struggling under debts of €46.6bn (£41bn) – bigger than those of a small country such as Iceland or Croatia, but still in line with the large debt of rail networks in places such as Britain, where the track operator, Network Rail, is facing its own financial woes.

The prime minister said France’s rail situation was alarming and untenable. “Whether or not they take the train, the French are paying more and more for a public service that works less and less well.”

The french prime minister, Édouard Philippe
The prime minister, Édouard Philippe, announcing reform plans for the SNCF on Monday. Photograph: Eric Feferberg/AFP/Getty Images
Unions had expressed fears of privatisation after an advisory report 10 days ago suggested turning SNCF into an autonomous company backed by public funds. Philippe insisted on Monday that privatisation was not on the cards. He said the SNCF would remain state-owned: it was part of French people’s heritage and “will stay that way”.

However he was firm on cutting rail workers’ special employment status. Many French rail workers have jobs for life and, in some cases, the right to retire in their 50s – a decade earlier than other public workers. Under government plans, these historical privileges would not be applied to new rail staff.

Philippe said France’s national railway company had to become more efficient before local and national passenger services open up to competition in coming years under European Union rules. But trade unions raged at the possible use of executive orders to force through changes – as used for Macron’s labour reforms last year. Jean-Claude Mailly, the head of the Force Ouvrière union, warned that using decrees would “pour oil on the fire”.

The government said the reform process would begin with a parliamentary debate in mid-March but in the event of wide opposition the assembly would not have a final vote.

The prime minister has said he would not close small local train lines, said to cost almost €2bn for only 2% of national passengers. This issue could now fall to regional authorities to decide.

Tags: French Railway Workersrail workersstrike
Categories: Labor News

USA: US Supreme Court Case Could Strip Union Rights from Millions of Workers

Labourstart.org News - Sun, 02/25/2018 - 16:00
LabourStart headline - Source: ITUC
Categories: Labor News

Kazakhstan: Global and European Trade Unions call on EU to Defend Fundamental Rights

Labourstart.org News - Sun, 02/25/2018 - 16:00
LabourStart headline - Source: ITUC
Categories: Labor News

USA: The Supreme Court Case That Could Devastate Unions

Labourstart.org News - Wed, 02/21/2018 - 16:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Bloomberg
Categories: Labor News

Ukraine: Ukrainian miners escalate protest against unpaid wages

Labourstart.org News - Wed, 02/21/2018 - 16:00
LabourStart headline - Source: IndustriALL
Categories: Labor News

UK: Lecturers at 50 universities walk off their jobs in pensions dispute

Labourstart.org News - Wed, 02/21/2018 - 16:00
LabourStart headline - Source: BBC
Categories: Labor News

Iran: Haft Tapeh workers in Iran win unpaid wages after months of struggle

Labourstart.org News - Wed, 02/21/2018 - 16:00
LabourStart headline - Source: IUF
Categories: Labor News

Former Portland BNSF rail engineer James Norvell fired for whistleblowing

Current News - Wed, 02/21/2018 - 14:42

Former Portland BNSF rail engineer James Norvell fired for whistleblowing
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n3H4_SZpadc

KING 5
Published on Jan 24, 2018
A train engineer says he was wrongfully terminated by Warren Buffet’s BNSF Railway Company after he prevented a crash. He is now suing his old employer in federal court, saying his case highlights concerns about how locomotives are repaired.

Portland Ex-BNSF engineer and whistleblower claims he was wrongly fired after avoiding rail mishap in Portland

Former BNSF engineer says he was fired for avoiding wreck
A former BNSF Railway locomotive engineer is suing the Class I railroad because he was allegedly fired after preventing a wreck at a yard in Portland, Ore., the Seattle Times reports. Earlier this month, a federal judge denied a motion by the railroad to throw out the case.

According to court documents, James T. Norvell, a 13-year veteran of the railroad, was operating a transfer job between two yards in Portland in 2015 when the locomotive’s brakes failed. Norvell put the locomotive in reverse, bringing it to a stop but causing significant damage. Norvell was terminated soon after. The engineer says he should not be fired because the railroad failed to maintain its locomotives and because his actions prevented a derailment or worse.

BNSF denies all of the allegations within the suit.

Portland Ex-BNSF engineer claims he was wrongly fired after avoiding rail mishap in Portland

https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/ex-bnsf-engineer-claims-he-was...

Originally published January 22, 2018 at 10:47 am Updated January 22, 2018 at 11:06 am
A federal judge recently denied the railroad’s request to dismiss a lawsuit filed by James T. Norvell, a Ballard resident, and scheduled a trial for later this year.

https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/ex-bnsf-engineer-claims-he-was...

Portland Ex-BNSF engineer and whistleblower claims he was wrongly fired after avoiding rail mishap in Portland
By Mike Carter
Seattle Times staff reporter

A former engineer for BNSF Railway now working and living in Ballard claims in

a federal whistleblower lawsuit that he was fired for damaging company property after he was forced to throw a runaway locomotive into reverse to avoid a potentially catastrophic accident in Portland in 2015.

https://www.documentcloud.org/documents/4356128-Norvell-Complaint.html

A federal judge in Tacoma earlier this month denied a motion by the railroad to dismiss the lawsuit filed in August by James T. Norvell, finding that Norvell’s claims at this point give him standing to sue over his contention that he was improperly fired for discharging a public duty — protecting the lives of citizens The lawsuit claims that the tracks within the yard “are unique in that they all run downhill.”

According to the suit, Norvell was aware there were others working around him and “knew there were loaded hazardous tank cars at the bottom of the yard and parked in a manner roughly broadside to the direction of travel of his train.”

Moreover, the lawsuit notes, the Willbridge Yard is surrounded by petroleum and chemical tank farms.

“If he could not stop the train, Norvell would have put the lives of his co-workers in peril and likely would have caused an enormous explosion and/or spill of hazardous materials that would have put the public at large in danger,” according to the lawsuit.

“With no other option to stop the train in time to avoid catastrophe, Norvell threw the throttle into reverse and was able to bring the train to a safe stop,” the lawsuit said.

The result, however, was that the locomotive sustained serious damage.

Four days after the incident, according to the lawsuit, Norvell was notified that BNSF had initiated disciplinary proceedings against him because he had “failed to properly stop your movement in accordance with proper train handling,” resulting in damage to the locomotive.

At a hearing a month later, Norvell presented evidence — in the form of an affidavit and testimony of a BNSF locomotive mechanic identified as Warren Stout — about shortcomings at the Vancouver, Washington, BNSF maintenance facility where Locomotive 2339 had recently been serviced.

Norvell also provided maintenance logs showing the locomotive “had brake rigging defects that had not been properly addressed despite multiple reports of the problem and multiple trips to the BNSF locomotive facilities in Vancouver and Seattle” before the July 12 incident at Willbridge Yard, according to the lawsuit.

Stout, according to the lawsuit and the sworn affidavit, concluded that BNSF’s “Band-Aid” approach to maintenance and its “refusal to authorize proper repairs to locomotives, including 2339, had resulted in a ‘fleet of substandard and noncompliant locomotives haunting the area.’ ”

One of Norvell’s attorneys, Jeff Dingwall, of San Diego, said the railway “chose to blame him instead of owning up to the fact” of the maintenance problems.

Sonja Fritts, a Seattle lawyer representing BNSF, declined to comment Thursday on the allegations and referred inquiries to BNSF Railway spokesman Gus Melonas, who said the railroad had no comment.

However, in its answer to Norvell’s complaint, filed with the court on Wednesday, the railway denied all of Norvell’s substantive claims, up to and including his allegations that the public was in danger, that a catastrophe was averted, and that the tracks at the Willbridge Yard slope downhill.

In seeking to dismiss the claim outright, BNSF argued that the company’s collective-bargaining agreement with the engineer’s union governs his dismissal and that Norvell’s case doesn’t belong in federal court.

U.S. District Judge Benjamin Settle disagreed and set a trial date for Sept. 17, although it is likely that will be delayed. In the meantime, both sides will proceed with discovery and depositions.

“It is clear that railroad employees such as plaintiff have important rights and duties under public policy that are protected independently of the [collective-bargaining agreements governing] their labor relations,” Settle wrote.

“For instance, [the law] expressly provides a cause of action for railroad employees who suffer retaliation for reporting railroad hazards and misconduct by railroad carriers,” the judge said.

Norvell now works as an engineer at the Ballard Terminal Railroad.

Mike Carter: mcarter@seattletimes.com or 206-464-3706

Categories: Labor News

Portland Ex-BNSF engineer and whistleblower claims he was wrongly fired after avoiding rail mishap in Portland

Current News - Wed, 02/21/2018 - 14:10

Portland Ex-BNSF engineer and whistleblower claims he was wrongly fired after avoiding rail mishap in Portland

Former BNSF engineer says he was fired for avoiding wreck
A former BNSF Railway locomotive engineer is suing the Class I railroad because he was allegedly fired after preventing a wreck at a yard in Portland, Ore., the Seattle Times reports. Earlier this month, a federal judge denied a motion by the railroad to throw out the case.

According to court documents, James T. Norvell, a 13-year veteran of the railroad, was operating a transfer job between two yards in Portland in 2015 when the locomotive’s brakes failed. Norvell put the locomotive in reverse, bringing it to a stop but causing significant damage. Norvell was terminated soon after. The engineer says he should not be fired because the railroad failed to maintain its locomotives and because his actions prevented a derailment or worse.

BNSF denies all of the allegations within the suit.

Portland Ex-BNSF engineer claims he was wrongly fired after avoiding rail mishap in Portland
https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/ex-bnsf-engineer-claims-he-was...
Originally published January 22, 2018 at 10:47 am Updated January 22, 2018 at 11:06 am
A federal judge recently denied the railroad’s request to dismiss a lawsuit filed by James T. Norvell, a Ballard resident, and scheduled a trial for later this year.

https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/ex-bnsf-engineer-claims-he-was...

Portland Ex-BNSF engineer and whistleblower claims he was wrongly fired after avoiding rail mishap in Portland
By Mike Carter
Seattle Times staff reporter

A former engineer for BNSF Railway now working and living in Ballard claims in

a federal whistleblower lawsuit that he was fired for damaging company property after he was forced to throw a runaway locomotive into reverse to avoid a potentially catastrophic accident in Portland in 2015.

https://www.documentcloud.org/documents/4356128-Norvell-Complaint.html

A federal judge in Tacoma earlier this month denied a motion by the railroad to dismiss the lawsuit filed in August by James T. Norvell, finding that Norvell’s claims at this point give him standing to sue over his contention that he was improperly fired for discharging a public duty — protecting the lives of citizens The lawsuit claims that the tracks within the yard “are unique in that they all run downhill.”

According to the suit, Norvell was aware there were others working around him and “knew there were loaded hazardous tank cars at the bottom of the yard and parked in a manner roughly broadside to the direction of travel of his train.”

Moreover, the lawsuit notes, the Willbridge Yard is surrounded by petroleum and chemical tank farms.

“If he could not stop the train, Norvell would have put the lives of his co-workers in peril and likely would have caused an enormous explosion and/or spill of hazardous materials that would have put the public at large in danger,” according to the lawsuit.

“With no other option to stop the train in time to avoid catastrophe, Norvell threw the throttle into reverse and was able to bring the train to a safe stop,” the lawsuit said.

The result, however, was that the locomotive sustained serious damage.

Four days after the incident, according to the lawsuit, Norvell was notified that BNSF had initiated disciplinary proceedings against him because he had “failed to properly stop your movement in accordance with proper train handling,” resulting in damage to the locomotive.

At a hearing a month later, Norvell presented evidence — in the form of an affidavit and testimony of a BNSF locomotive mechanic identified as Warren Stout — about shortcomings at the Vancouver, Washington, BNSF maintenance facility where Locomotive 2339 had recently been serviced.

Norvell also provided maintenance logs showing the locomotive “had brake rigging defects that had not been properly addressed despite multiple reports of the problem and multiple trips to the BNSF locomotive facilities in Vancouver and Seattle” before the July 12 incident at Willbridge Yard, according to the lawsuit.

Stout, according to the lawsuit and the sworn affidavit, concluded that BNSF’s “Band-Aid” approach to maintenance and its “refusal to authorize proper repairs to locomotives, including 2339, had resulted in a ‘fleet of substandard and noncompliant locomotives haunting the area.’ ”

One of Norvell’s attorneys, Jeff Dingwall, of San Diego, said the railway “chose to blame him instead of owning up to the fact” of the maintenance problems.

Sonja Fritts, a Seattle lawyer representing BNSF, declined to comment Thursday on the allegations and referred inquiries to BNSF Railway spokesman Gus Melonas, who said the railroad had no comment.

However, in its answer to Norvell’s complaint, filed with the court on Wednesday, the railway denied all of Norvell’s substantive claims, up to and including his allegations that the public was in danger, that a catastrophe was averted, and that the tracks at the Willbridge Yard slope downhill.

In seeking to dismiss the claim outright, BNSF argued that the company’s collective-bargaining agreement with the engineer’s union governs his dismissal and that Norvell’s case doesn’t belong in federal court.

U.S. District Judge Benjamin Settle disagreed and set a trial date for Sept. 17, although it is likely that will be delayed. In the meantime, both sides will proceed with discovery and depositions.

“It is clear that railroad employees such as plaintiff have important rights and duties under public policy that are protected independently of the [collective-bargaining agreements governing] their labor relations,” Settle wrote.

“For instance, [the law] expressly provides a cause of action for railroad employees who suffer retaliation for reporting railroad hazards and misconduct by railroad carriers,” the judge said.

Norvell now works as an engineer at the Ballard Terminal Railroad.

Mike Carter: mcarter@seattletimes.com or 206-464-3706

Tags: BNSF Engineerwhistleblowerrail accidentBNSF
Categories: Labor News

SPANISH BARCLONA DOCKERS STRIKE! ‘CNT PORTUARIS’ COMMUNIQUE !!

Current News - Tue, 02/20/2018 - 20:11

SPANISH BARCLONA DOCKERS STRIKE! ‘CNT PORTUARIS’ COMMUNIQUE !!

”Our affiliates are accused of putting their own lives ahead of the economic benefits of the company. And that’s why they ARE DISMISSED.

700 people die each year in work accidents in the Spanish State. THIS STRIKE IS FOR THEM. This strike is for all of you, WORKERS, who, like our companions, are forced day after day to choose between your safety or your sustenance.

First of all, DIGNITY. Soon they will know that we are not merchandise.

ALL TO THE PORT OF BARCELONA ON DAYS 15, 16 and 17 FEBRUARY.

COME TO SUPPORT THE STRIKE IN THE MOORING!”

Statement on the dismissal of three Dockers in the Port of Barcelona
Enviat per Sec. Premsa

Dismissal of three union workers without any cause. The message is clear: the firm defense of workers’ rights is not allowed. We pick up the glove. One month before the Trial for Collective Conflict is held before the Social Chamber of the Superior Court of Justice of Catalonia, our company MOORING & PORT SERVICE intends to gain an advantage .that will allow it to influence collective bargaining

Three of our affiliates of the Mooring Section of the Port of Barcelona were dismissed yesterday after the disciplinary file that the company opened last Friday, accusing the workers of having disobeyed an order from the company to perform a special service.

The company has ordeed the dismissal without considering ANY of the allegations of the workers:

– That the conduct they now punish can not be a reason for sanction, because the company had tolerated it until now, in which, surprisingly, it has executed 3 dismissals.

– That the behavior that is punished is classified as SERIOUS (and not very serious) in our disciplinary regime, so the maximum penalty is 30 days of employment and salary.

– That the sanction to one of the workers was prescribed.

– That a worker is not obliged to execute the orders of the company if they entail a danger, they are illegal or if they do not belong to their duties.

Our company, MOORING & PORT SERVICE, provides mooring and unmooring services to merchant ships that enter and leave the Port of Barcelona. But the owner of MOORING has another port services company: RUDDER LOGÍSTICS. To save costs, and as we are on duty 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, instead of hiring their own staff, they use our staff (ILLEGAL ASSIGNMENT OF WORKERS) to do some services that:

-Do not appear in our contract

-Do not appear in the functions of our agreement or in the internal reguloations

-Do not appear in the Occupational Risk Prevention Plan of the company.

– They are jobs for which we have not received training and which entail a high intrinsic danger (handling of cranes, transport of dangerous goods, etc.).

– These are jobs that, in many cases, are illegal, since we transport dangerous goods by sea without respecting international regulations, as well as the transport of people from ships to the city without any control or registration, without going through customs. , etc. (We would be delighted that the company gave those facilities to people in need of refuge that die every day in the Mediterranean, but certainly not the case.).

Our affiliates are accused of putting their own lives ahead of the economic benefits of the company. And that’s why they ARE DISMISSED.

700 people die each year in work accidents in the Spanish State. THIS STRIKE IS FOR THEM. This strike is for all of you, WORKERS, who, like our companions, are forced day after day to choose between your safety or your sustenance.

First of all, DIGNITY. Soon they will know that we are not merchandise.

ALL TO THE PORT OF BARCELONA ON DAYS 15, 16 and 17 FEBRUARY.

COME TO SUPPORT THE STRIKE IN THE MOORING!

PS: We did not want to miss the opportunity to transmit a MESSAGE to a special person. IGNACIO BERRUEZO: you must know that the CNT is not intimidated by the port MAFIA.

See also:
http://cntbarcelona.org/vaga-damarradors-comunicat-de-cnt-portuaris/

earlier report from La Directa

The CNT rejects the conditions of the company to readmit the moorings of the port of Barcelona and keep the strike

Mooring & Port wants to keep a very serious sanction on workers to oppose doing tasks that exceed their obligations, and to force them to renounce their right to challenge it through judicial channels
Assembly on February 7 to support the three dismissed workers
by Gemma Garcia 02/12/2018

It is two thirty seven in the afternoon on Wednesday, February 7th and about a hundred workers gather at the Muelle de Sant Beltran 4, at Tinglado 3, of the labyrinth port of Barcelona. CNT Portuaris has called an assembly to the Mooring & Port company following the dismissal of three moorings.

The ties of solidarity between maritime workers are solid and have become evident on other occasions, as with the fight against the dismantling of the sector. Everyone responds to the call: the CGT tug boat group, the Tepsa liquid liquor storage company, the Union de Trabajadores del Puerto Union (USTP) and the Port Dockers Organization (Coordinator BCN), as well as members of the Business Committee of the Worker Organization of Port Company (OTEP).

The assembly was key. The CNT had already made a strike announcement for February 15, 16 and 17 in case of non-readmission of the three workers, but at that meeting it was agreed .to push all together to pressure the company

Only two days later, with a conciliation meeting in between, Mooring it was reported that he would readmit the three workers. “With the strike announcement we have used our negotiating force,” says Enrique Costoya, the lawyer of the anarchist union, who was clear that victory is the result of not only the pressure of the squad but the whole port that has given us support “.

But the three workers then received a letter of dismissal on February 1, where they were accused of having “disobeyed the direct orders of their hierarchical superiors”

Costoya regrets that Mooring intends to maintain a very serious penalty and to force the moorings to renounce their right to challenge it by judicial means. “We can not accept it, so let’s go on strike,” he concludes.

Disobedience referred to the fact that the three, on different dates, had refused to carry out the supply of a vessel of the same company, because, according to the mooring agreement, it is not part of its obligations.

The document defines that they carry out “tasks of mooring or unloading of ships, as well as other tasks related to the internal traffic of ports according to the use and practice of each of them.” The cargo of merchandise is not contemplated in the plan of prevention of occupational hazards of the company and doing so may mean end up manipulating carts and pallets with corrosive, toxic or flammable products.

The company opened a disciplinary record although the Workers Agreement itself states that “mere disobedience to its superiors in any matter of service” is a serious fault, but which can only entail suspension of work and salary of two to thirty days / Gemma Garcia….

In the middle of the conflict, the CNT also warned on social networks that the company had given orders to put all vehicles in a ship to avoid retaliation by the union. Under this pretext, they welded an internal pin and installed a loop leaving all the lathe workers locked in.

A collective conflict as a backdrop

The collective conflict is due to be resolved on March 15 in the High Court of Justice of Catalonia. The origin is in the refusal of the company to pay 96 hours extra to a dismissed worker. His count of hours, explains the CNT, had exceeded the annual work time of 1,836 hours established in the Workers’ Statute and in May of 2015, a judge gave the reason.

On the one hand, the hours that exceed the established, by being overtime, are voluntary not obligatory and, on the other, they should be paid.

The workers of the CNT already put on the table that Mooring, with the layoffs, had tried to influence the collective conflict that will be resolved on March 15th in the High Court of Justice of Catalonia…..At present, moorings are working around 2,000 annual hours and therefore there are about sixty more. Mooring & Port Services SL ended the monopoly of the mooring and unpacking service in the port of Barcelona that was in the hands of CEMESA.

Tags: Barcelona Dockers Strike
Categories: Labor News

ATU 1555 BART employees report being kicked, punched, spat on, held hostage “I never thought a simple questions to assist a passenger would lead to me being assaulted,” said ATU 1555 President Gena Alexander, who is also a train operator but on leave due

Current News - Tue, 02/20/2018 - 08:38

ATU 1555 BART employees report being kicked, punched, spat on, held hostage
“I never thought a simple questions to assist a passenger would lead to me being assaulted,” said ATU 1555 President Gena Alexander, who is also a train operator but on leave due to her current union position.

http://www.ktvu.com/news/bart-employees-report-being-kicked-punched-spat...

By: Candice Nguyen
POSTED: FEB 19 2018 02:19PM PST
VIDEO POSTED: FEB 19 2018 10:51PM PST
UPDATED: FEB 19 2018 10:57PM PST
OAKLAND, Calif. (KTVU) - As police continue to investigate assaults and mob-style robberies against riders, attacks on BART employees are also steadily rising. These are scenarios where station agents and train operators are kicked, spat on, punched, held hostage, threatened with weapons and pushed down stairwells, according to data obtained by 2 Investigates.

From 2013 to 2017, there were 20 reported violent attacks against BART train operators and 174 reported attacks against station agents, BART crimes data shows.

BART officials acknowledged that these attacks come at a time when BART is down police officers and would like to hire more to patrol more consistently and effectively.

“I never thought a simple questions to assist a passenger would lead to me being assaulted,” said ATU 1555 President Gena Alexander, who is also a train operator but on leave due to her current union position.

Alexander said when she was a station agent, a passenger waited for her to leave her booth and then spat and hit her. A struggle ensued resulting in the attacker pulling out Alexander’s hair. She suffered other injuries, which she said forced her to take time off work.

Year-to-year data on station agent and train operator assaults show the number of annual reports increasing in recent years. From 2015 to 2016, the annual number of reports about doubled. Yet the actual numbers of assaults are significantly higher, multiple train operators told 2 Investigates. They say a significant, yet unknown, number of cases go unreported.

As a train operator later in her career, Alexander said she faced similar situations. “It’s scary being the last train of the night and having to sweep [clear it of passengers] by yourself hoping and praying when you pull in, BART police is there to assist you,” she said.

BART train operator Marvin Jones said he was also attacked on the job during an end of line sweep. He said a man refusing to leave the train threw a phone and struck his face.

“If [the attackers] are going to do it to us, it’s just a matter of time it’s going to happen to passengers,” Jones said.

Station Agent Dana Reeves has been working for BART for 17 years and said she never had an incident until recently.

“I’ve been assaulted twice within the last two weeks,” Reeves said.

On Jan. 6, Reeves said she was closing the 16th and Mission BART station alone when a man on drugs forced himself into her booth trapping her inside. She said it was an unprovoked incident.

“I didn’t know if he had weapons. Is he going to kill me?” she said. “I want to defend myself but I don’t because I don’t want to lose my job.”

Alexander agreed saying, “There is a tendency by management to attack the employee and put them in the seat where they are the defendant.”

BART policy does in fact prohibit all employees from possessing any sort of weapon or self defense tool while on the job or face disciplinary procedures up to and including termination. In a statement, BART wrote, in part:

“Safety is our top priority at BART. That extends to not just to our riders by also our employees….If an employee feels they are in an unsafe situation we encourage them to try to create a safe distance between themselves and a potential threat. Our emphasis is on de-escalating a situation before it turns violent. Employees are trained to disengage, remain in a safe place, and contact BART Police immediately...If a BART worker finds themselves in a situation where they have no other recourse against an immediate threat, then they can defend themselves.”

BART Police Chief Carlos Rojas told 2 Investigates it is protocol for his officers to help train operators clear cars of passengers at the end of the night, but sometimes other high-priority calls force them to respond to something else. His department is working to hire more officers.

“Over time, the department lost personnel through attrition, retirement and other things. All of the suddenly you end up with 36 vacancies,” Rojas said. “What I can tell you, from a legal perspective, everybody has the right of self defense under the law.”

Tags: ATU 1555oshahealth and safetyinjuries on the job
Categories: Labor News

Georgia: Gov't to Impose Increased Fines for Breach of Safety Norms at Construction Sites

Labourstart.org News - Mon, 02/19/2018 - 16:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Georgia Today
Categories: Labor News

Another Possible Attack On ILWU Port Workers-Close Howard Terminal-Commissioner visits A’s potential stadium sites

Current News - Sat, 02/17/2018 - 09:25

Another Possible Attack On ILWU Port Workers-Close Howard Terminal-Commissioner visits A’s potential stadium sites
Commissioner visits A’s potential stadium sites
https://www.sfchronicle.com/athletics/article/MLB-commissioner-visits-st...
By Susan SlusserFebruary 16, 2018 Updated: February 16, 2018 4:08pm

Photo: Noah Berger, Special To The Chronicle
IMAGE 1 OF 2A ship docks at the Howard Terminal, one of the sites under consideration for a new Oakland Athletics baseball stadium, on Saturday, May 27, 2017, in Oakland, Calif.
MESA, Ariz. — Commissioner Rob Manfred was in Oakland last month and visited potential A’s stadium sites, team president Dave Kaval told The Chronicle on Friday.

“The commissioner came to look at our new offices and I think he was impressed, and he also looked at the sites for a ballpark,” Kaval said at the A’s minor-league complex. “It was nice to give him a good tour.”

According to sources, the main focus of Manfred’s visit was Howard Terminal, the waterfront area near Jack London Square that is minutes away from the team’s new offices and is one of three areas the A’s have pinpointed during their stadium search.

Manfred has visited the A’s preferred site near Laney College previously, and of course he’s familiar with the third option, the Coliseum. Manfred is in regular contact with Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf — a longtime supporter of the Howard Terminal site — and as Kaval noted, MLB has extensive experience with helping to troubleshoot stadium development issues.

“More than anything, we want to make sure everyone knows our efforts in Oakland to build a privately financed stadium and what it will take to make that happen — working with all the key stakeholders: the league, the city, maybe the port, the (Coliseum Joint Powers Authority),” Kaval said. “The league has a lot of expertise when it comes to ballpark development and situations that have worked and not worked, and relying on that I think is important.”

In trying to evaluate the transportation issues, for example, at Howard Terminal — which is a 20-minute walk from the nearest BART station — MLB can point to past workarounds in Cleveland, Baltimore and Toronto, Kaval said, adding, “That’s really where the league can be a best-practice clearinghouse.”

The A’s remain “100 percent focused on Oakland,” Kaval reiterated. “Obviously, we had a setback with our preferred site, but we’re still looking at all three sites and working with our partners and various stakeholders with a timeline for a 2023 opening, and we’re still on track with that path.”

Minor-leaguer starts fund: A’s pitching prospect Jesus Luzardo, obtained in the Sean Doolittle deal with Washington last year, graduated from Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla, two years ago. Friday, the right-hander created a memorial fund for the family of murdered athletic director Chris Hixon.

”Chris played a huge role in supporting my dreams of becoming a professional baseball player and his loss will be felt by everyone in the Douglas community,” Luzardo said in a post with the fund.

To donate, go to https://www.youcaring.com/familiesofthedouglashighschoolvictims-1101050#....

Susan Slusser is a San Francisco Chronicle staff writer.

Tags: Oakland Howard TerminalilwuOakland A's Ball Park
Categories: Labor News

Australia: The NSW chalkie who rose to rule the industrial world

Labourstart.org News - Fri, 02/16/2018 - 16:00
LabourStart headline - Source: SMH
Categories: Labor News

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