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1934 Teamsters Strike Memorialized In Minneapolis

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Mon, 07/20/2015 - 07:28
CBSJuly 20, 2015View the original piece

A memorial plaque commemorating the 1934 Teamsters Strike in Minneapolis was unveiled Saturday.

Historians call that strike one of the watershed moments in the history of the American labor movement.

Click here to read more.

Categories: Labor News, Unions

Ben Fletcher: portrait of a black syndicalist

Current News - Sun, 07/19/2015 - 09:56

A biography of IWW member Ben Fletcher, written by Jeff Stein.

Originally appeared in the Libertarian Labor Review (Summer 1987) Scanned by Juan Conatz for libcom.org. Materials courtesy of Twin Cities IWW archives.

Tags: IWWsyndicalismmarine transport workersPhiladelphiaAttach PDF:  FletcherbyStein.PDF
Categories: Labor News

Global: Coca-Cola writes to ITUC's Sharan Burrow backing FIFA reform campagin

Labourstart.org News - Sat, 07/18/2015 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Associated Press
Categories: Labor News

Thailand: Thailand must end harassment of researchers and human rights defenders

Labourstart.org News - Sat, 07/18/2015 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Finnwatch
Categories: Labor News

Help the Boston school bus drivers win the third and final round against union-busting

Current News - Fri, 07/17/2015 - 14:29

Help the Boston school bus drivers win the third and final round against union-busting
http://bostonschoolbus5.org/schoolbusappeal715/

SUPPORT THE ONLINE FUNDRAISING CAMPAIGN
​youcaring.com/rehirethe4

or send checks to: Friends of the School Bus 5

P.O. Box 141 Stoughton, MA 02072

Like many union struggles, the Boston school bus driver fight has been a long one.
Four of the union’s leaders were unjustly and illegally fired by the union-busting Veolia Corp in November 2013—and still haven’t gotten their jobs back.

The company they are up against, recently renamed Transdev, is not only notorious for union-busting—which is bad enough—but Transdev supports Israeli apartheid by operating segregated rail lines in the occupied West Bank.

But unlike many protracted union struggles, this union—Steelworkers Local 8751, with a majority immigrant workforce of Haitian, Cape Verdean as well as African American workers—has won a series of stunning victories in its fight for justice.

The first one came in early March, when a transparent union-busting attempt by Veolia to frame union Vice President Steve Kirschbaum with a series of false felony charges was crushed. A working class jury returned a not-guilty verdict in a record ten minutes.

That was round one. Round two came when, in the union’s highest-ever election turnout, the members voted in the full slate of Team Solidarity candidates—led by the fired leaders!—by a landslide to the union’s Executive Board.

Team Solidarity's winning slate, including the illegally fired leaders

One could compare this righteous upset to socialist labor leader Eugene Debs getting a million votes for U.S. president while in jail for opposing World War 1. As sweet as this second victory was, the members know that the third and final battle has not been won: the reinstatement of the four.

Veolia has gone even further in its attempts to break this mighty union. To give just one example, they illegally issued an ultimatum, with threats to eliminate a million dollars in retroactive pay raises, if the workers do not accept a concession-laden “last best offer” to replace the contract that expired June of last year. Not only is Veolia trying to starve out the four, the company is using every trick in the book to create a division between them and the membership as contract negotiations drag on.

Veolia has yet again underestimated the united resolve of this class-conscious, militant union, whose members march with the Black Lives Matter and LGBTQ movement. But the four do need help to continue this fight. This isn’t the typical case of a strike where the union has a strike fund—though a strike may well be coming. The four fired drivers, out of work 22 months, are relying on solidarity donations to support themselves and their families while they fight for their jobs and perform their duties as elected union leaders.

Online campaign: ​youcaring.com/rehirethe4

Send checks to:

Friends of the School Bus 5

P.O. Box 141

Stoughton, MA 02072

Tags: USWBoston School Bus Drivers
Categories: Labor News

Coli’s Real Estate Deal Costs Local 700 Members $2.3 million

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Fri, 07/17/2015 - 11:20

July 17, 2015: International Vice President John Coli and Chicago Local 700 have been hit with a $2.3 million judgement for trying to escape a building lease.

$2.0 million in damages are owed jointly by Coli and Local 700, and $320,000 by the local alone.  The judgement came about when Local 700 ran away from a building lease, and an agreement to buy the building, signed by Local 726, when Local 726 was merged into Local 700 in 2009.

The court ruled that Local 700 is a successor to Local 726, and Local 700 is responsible for the damages. According to a press report issued by the winning attorney, the judge found the evidence “overwhelming” that Coli orchestrated “an unlawful scheme to defraud a creditor.”

The local and Coli may appeal the ruling. Thus the ultimate decision may come later.

How the local will pay $2.3 million is anybody’s guess, but you can bet your mortgage money that John Coli will not personally pay a penny. He will have Local 700 President Becky Strzechowski assess the members if necessary to cause it to be paid by dues money from the rank and file members of Local 700. 

You can read the decision of Judge Raymond Mitchell

Categories: Labor News, Unions

IWW Greece Marches Against Austerity - July 15, 2015

IWW - Fri, 07/17/2015 - 10:39

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See more and get the latest updates at: https://www.facebook.com/IWWGreece

Categories: Unions

Top 100 Carriers Get More Selective With Freight as Capacity Remains Tight

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Fri, 07/17/2015 - 06:53
Daniel P. BearthTransport TopicsJuly 17, 2015View the original piece

The nation’s largest for-hire carriers are becoming more selective about the freight they haul, taking steps to minimize delays and focusing on better utilization of equipment and personnel as strong demand and a shortage of drivers continue to strain capacity. But tight capacity isn’t necessarily hampering growth for carriers on the Transport Topics Top 100 list, as the number of companies on this year’s ranking with annual revenue of at least $1 billion increased to 35 from 30 the previous year.

Click here to read more at Transport Topics.

Issues: Freight
Categories: Labor News, Unions

Union Busting In DC Against ATU Transit Workers-DC unions back streetcar workers fired for organizing

Current News - Thu, 07/16/2015 - 23:24

Union Busting In DC Against ATU Transit Workers-DC unions back streetcar workers fired for organizing
http://www.peoplesworld.org/dc-unions-back-streetcar-workers-fired-for-o...
DC unions back streetcar workers fired for organizing

by: LARRY RUBIN
july 13 2015

WASHINGTON - In a show of rock-solid unity, representatives of some 50,000 members of Washington, DC area unions rallied at DC's city hall to protest the awarding of more money to a multinational corporation that has failed to complete a streetcar line on time, has created many cost overruns and has illegally fired eight employees for starting to organize a union.

"The fired streetcar workers are heroes," Metropolitan Washington Council AFL-CIO President Joslyn Williams told the protestors. "They wanted the ATU - the Amalgamated Transit Union -- to represent them. They stood up for the right of workers to organize a union. They stood up for the dignity of workers."

The ATU filed an unfair labor practice complaint on behalf of the workers with the National Labor Relations Board, but the charges have been difficult to process because of the complex system of management created by the District of Columbia. The District Department of Transportation (DDOT) oversees the streetcar project, but that agency contracted out the work to a joint venture of the RATP Development Group and McDonald Transit, an American subsidiary of an international public transit operator based in France. The corporation, in turn, contracted out the hiring of workers to The Midtown Group.

The streetcar project began almost six years ago. The goal: building a light rail system across DC starting with a pilot project covering what is known as the H Street corridor. Now, six years later, the proposed streetcar system is still stuck at the pilot project phase, which has been plagued by malfunctioning cars, crashes, fires, and mismanagement.

Nevertheless, the transit corporation requested an additional $5.5 million, which would bring the total cost of the project to $15 million more than the originally agreed upon price. ATU representatives urged DC officials not to sink more money into the project until the NLRB completed its investigation of the firings and until problems plaguing the project were addressed. However, two weeks ago, DC Mayor Muriel Bowser and the DC Council approved the funds.

"This is an insult to District residents," said Larry Hanley, ATU international president, "and it's a slap in the face to those workers who remain on the job but are scared of being fired if they demand union rights.".

At the protest rally, Germaine Wells, one of the workers fired for wanting a union, said "I was born and raised in DC and am proud of DC. I was fired for no reason except that I wanted a union. I have been waiting to be allowed to help complete the streetcar project."

ATU members delivered some 400 petitions to Mayor Bowser demanding that the fired workers be rehired and that safety reviews be completed before the project is expanded.

President Williams ended the rally by saying "workers have a right to choose who will represent them. No politician, no corporation will stop workers from organizing."

Photo: Metropolitan Washington Council AFL-CIO President Joslyn Williams: "The fired streetcar workers are heroes."

Tags: atufiringsunion busting
Categories: Labor News

HK CWA AFA UAL Action

Current News - Thu, 07/16/2015 - 17:50

HK CWA AFA UAL Action
http://www.thestandard.com.hk/news_detail.asp?we_cat=11&art_id=159164&si...
United action at pay deal delay

Nicole Hurip

Friday, July 17, 2015

More than 40 staff from different carriers united in solidarity at Chek Lap Kok airport yesterday to demand better contract terms for United Airlines flight attendants.
The protesters included pilots from Dragonair and Federal Express, along with United Airlines flight attendants.

The workers some wearing yellow shirts and others their uniforms protested outside Terminal One from 8am.

They said they joined the action before or after their shifts.

They took banners and mounted a silent protest in front of United Airlines' counters from 9am for about 45 minutes.

The banners had slogans that read "Friendly isn't free," "Delay, delay, delay, not okay," and "Record profit$$$. It's our turn."

The Association of Flight Attendants-CWA conducted the "day of action" at 20 airports worldwide calling on United Airlines to negotiate a fair contract for flight attendants.

The union and Chicago-based United Airlines have been locked in bitter contract negotiations for the past three years. Local association president Narayanan Nakulan said United Airlines wants to "turn back the clock," criticizing it for offering the staff the lowest-paying contract possible.

He also claimed that the company has been digging in its heels since April, making the negotiations stagnant by not proposing any new options.

"The company has been blaming our negotiators ... [for] not being very forthcoming in terms of looking at the financial model [of the company]," Nakulan said.

He suggested management follow the lead of American Airlines and Delta, which he said have been much more successful in managing their employees.

The association said since negotiations began, United's share price has risen 162 percent, and chief executive Jeff Smisek's salary was boosted by 32 percent.

In comparison, United's frontline staff's wages have increased by less than US$1 (HK$7.80) a year for the past five years, according to the union.

A union among the three groups Continental Micronesia, United Airlines and Continental Airlines was formed five years ago, but they are not yet merged and do not fly together because United Airlines and the association at United have yet to agree on wages, working conditions and benefits.

The two parties reached a protocol agreement made late last year, with United setting a target date of July 23 to reach a full tentative agreement.

Tags: CWAAFAUALContractFlight Attendants
Categories: Labor News

UK: Tories launch biggest crackdown on trade unions for 30 years

Labourstart.org News - Thu, 07/16/2015 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Guardian
Categories: Labor News

Global: FIFA’s in crisis - but you can save it.

Labourstart.org News - Thu, 07/16/2015 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: ITUC
Categories: Labor News

Greece: Cleaners swept out of work after Tsipras U-turn

Labourstart.org News - Thu, 07/16/2015 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: CNBC
Categories: Labor News

Iran: Mobilisation continues to release Iran teacher unionist

Labourstart.org News - Thu, 07/16/2015 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: Education International
Categories: Labor News

CONTRACT NOW! CWA AFT SFO Flight Attendants, UAL Teamsters and Other Workers Demand A Contract

Current News - Thu, 07/16/2015 - 16:18

CONTRACT NOW! CWA AFT SFO Flight Attendants, UAL Teamsters and Other Workers Demand A Contract
http://youtu.be/QfzYj3IVHkk
On July 16, 2015, an international day of action at airports throughout the world to get a contract for the 24,000 UAL AFA flight attendants. They have been without a contract for longer than 3 years and hundreds marched and rallied in San Francisco.
Production of Labor Video Project
www.laborvideo.org

Tags: CWA AFAContractUALIBTsolidarity
Categories: Labor News

What would the “Promises Act” mean for Central States Teamsters?

Teamsters for a Democratic Union - Thu, 07/16/2015 - 07:52

July 16, 2015: The Keep Our Pension Promises Act, introduced in the US Senate and House would keep promises made to over 200,000 Teamster retirees as well as to working Teamsters who retire in the future.

That’s why Teamsters and retiree committees are mobilizing – along with other unions, the AARP, and pension advocates – to back it.

Read the Pension Rights Center’s summary on how the Promises Act Would Save the Central States Fund.

The Pension Rights Center also has an explanation of how the Pension Promises Act would work.

The IBT has endorsed the bill, which is a good first step. But Hoffa is not yet putting Teamster political muscle behind it. We call on all Teamster leaders – and the Teamster trustees of the Central States Fund, to support our retirees, our future, and keep our pension funds strong and viable.

Issues: Pension and Benefits
Categories: Labor News, Unions

Uber Could Have to Pay an Additional $209 Million to Reclassify Its Drivers in California

Current News - Thu, 07/16/2015 - 06:56

Uber Could Have to Pay an Additional $209 Million to Reclassify Its Drivers in California
http://recode.net/2015/07/14/uber-could-have-to-pay-an-additional-209-mi...

By Carmel DeAmicis

July 14, 2015, 3:00 AM PDT

Uber says many of its drivers prefer being contract workers to full-fledged employees, a blunt response to a raging debate among on-demand startups. Of course, that answer suits Uber very well, since its business is founded on that very idea — to say nothing of its purported $40 billion value.

And that’s why it’s currently fighting a lawsuit that would otherwise force it to reclassify its California drivers as employees.

So what would it cost the company if it lost its suit? Uber declined to comment*, but Re/code built a rough model with the help of ZenPayroll, the startup that automates paycheck systems for small- and medium-sized businesses. We calculated that Uber could pay an additional $208.7 million a year if it had to reclassify its California drivers.

It breaks down to about $89.1 million for payroll taxes for 45,000 drivers working 20 hours a week in the state, and roughly $119.6 million per year in workers’ compensation insurance. Altogether, it’s $4,637 per employee in California.

That doesn’t include the cost of gas or vehicle repair, which Uber would be legally required to cover under California Labor Code Section 2802.

We narrowed the parameters to just California, since that’s where a big chunk of its drivers work and because each state has different tax codes. Since Uber doesn’t publicly release how many drivers it has in California, we used some available data to make estimates and worked with SherpaShare, a third-party application that helps ride-share drivers track their work (see below for our methodology).

That additional $209 million in annual costs needs to compare against Uber’s revenue, which isn’t public. The most recent reported numbers put Uber’s sales at a $10 billion run rate through this year, and since it pays drivers 80 percent of the fare, Uber’s net annual run rate would be about $2 billion.

Looking just at California (which is likely still its largest driver base in the U.S.), the added cost of making drivers employees would account for a little over 10 percent of Uber’s net revenue, not a small portion. But it’s not insurmountable, especially given Uber’s rapid growth.

The company, led by CEO Travis Kalanick, is fighting driver classification lawsuits state by state, and thanks to the fragmentation of the legal system there’s unlikely to be a nationally binding precedent unless a group of drivers successfully file and win a class action suit for the entire country.

What makes Uber special in the eyes of investors is its lower costs. It’s basically a piece of software connecting drivers to riders, which, for now, means it doesn’t have to pay those drivers’ health care, payroll taxes or workers’ compensation insurance.

If Uber does have to reclassify, it wouldn’t just be hit by additional taxes — it could suffer major penalties for all the drivers it had mis-classified up until now. FedEx, perhaps the closest parallel, had to pay a $228 million settlement when it lost a class action suit about the way it classified its California drivers.

To do a deeper dive into the numbers, here’s how we calculated Uber’s payroll costs.

Number of drivers
To estimate the number of drivers Uber has in California, we cobbled together a few sources. In May, Uber publicly said it has around 20,000 drivers in the San Francisco Bay Area. Uber’s Los Angeles General Manager told driver analytics tool SherpaShare in February that Uber’s L.A. market has 10,000 active drivers. SherpaShare estimates 15,000 or so others scattered around the rest of the state in places like San Diego and Santa Barbara. That brings us to roughly 45,000 active drivers in California.

Number of hours
We don’t have the average number of hours drivers work each week for Uber. It varies from person to person and there’s a high rate of turnover. For the sake of the model, we estimated that each driver in California was driving 20 hours a week.

We estimated that drivers in California make roughly $21.29 per hour by averaging the $17.07 per hour that L.A. drivers make and the $25.51 per hour that S.F. drivers make — those numbers came from a study commissioned by Uber.

ZenPayroll calculation
Cost of 45,000 employees working 20 hours a week at $21.29 per hour

Gross Wages: $996,372,000.00

Social Security (6.2 percent): $61,775,064.00

Medicare (1.45 percent): $14,447,394.00

California Unemployment* (3.4 percent): $10,710,000.00

California Employment Training Tax** (.1 percent): $315,000.00

Federal Unemployment** (.6 percent): $1,890,000.00

Total Employer Taxes per year: $89,137,458.00

* The new employer rate in CA for unemployment is 3.4 percent and is used for a period of two to three years. It’s worth noting it can change over time based on the turnover rates of a particular company.

** The percentage wage base limit for California and Federal Unemployment is calculated based on a capped salary of $7000 per employee per year. These calculations assume zero annual turnover for all 45,000 employees. High turnover can drastically increase these taxes by millions of dollars.

Workers’ compensation
Workers’ compensation insurance rates change depending on local regions and depend on the deals companies strike with brokers. AP Intego Insurance Group estimated the annual cost for a transportation company like Uber in California would be approximately 12 percent of each driver’s salary.

Expenses and benefits
Thanks to the Affordable Care Act, Uber wouldn’t be required to pay for drivers’ health care — it would just need to negotiate a group rate, and drivers would cover their own premiums. For the sake of simplicity, we left out other variable costs like vacation accrual, overtime pay and expenses (like gas and car repair). You can imagine the latter would be a huge cost for Uber.

*Update: Uber declined to comment on Re/code’s analysis and instead offered this statement: “As employees, drivers would lose the flexibility and control they value most; instead they would drive set shifts, earn a fixed hourly wage, and lose the ability to drive with other ridesharing platforms.” The company also added that 73 percent of its “partners” prefer being their own boss instead of having a job with benefits and a salary.

Tags: UberDrivers
Categories: Labor News

The SFMTA should lower the taxicab medallion transfer price "What was once something that provided a present and a future for working-class people is now an albatross around the neck."

Current News - Thu, 07/16/2015 - 06:11

The SFMTA should lower the taxicab medallion transfer price "What was once something that provided a present and a future for working-class people is now an albatross around the neck."
http://www.sfexaminer.com/the-sfmta-should-lower-the-taxicab-medallion-t...
By Peter Kirby on July 15, 2015 7:26 pm
Career taxicab drivers are now being forced to buy taxicab medallions, rather than earning and receiving them for a one-time nominal fee. In recent years, the value of a medallion has dropped like a stone while the medallion price set by the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency has remained the same. Medallion transfers (purchases) have slowed to a trickle. For these reasons, the SFMTA should be responsive to market conditions and lower the medallion transfer price.

When I put my name on the taxicab medallion waiting list in 1998, I agreed to a deal whereby when my name got to the top of the list, I would be granted a taxicab medallion for a one-time fee of maybe a couple of thousand dollars. Once granted, I would take that medallion to the taxicab company of my choice and from there on out receive checks in the amount of about $2,300 per month for as long as I held the medallion. This was to be on top of whatever I made driving the cab. When I retired from the industry, the medallion was to go back to The City. That was a profit-sharing program, which provides for a middle class. That lets working-class people buy houses, raise kids and put them through college. It was a situation that provided working-class people with a secure financial future.

Then came the SFMTA’s medallion sales programs. Without being given an opt-out, the SFMTA changed the terms of my agreement without my consent. No longer could I earn a medallion for a one-time fee. Now I am forced to buy a medallion for $250,000 with a minimum down payment of $12,500 and about a 5 percent interest rate to pay off the rest over 30 years. Sure, I get to sell it when I’m done with it, but I need money now and, under the former deal, I could save for my future. As it stands now, I can forget about raising kids properly or buying a house.

Not only that, but in the meantime The City has allowed Uber and the other Transportation Network Companies to suck most of the profits out of the taxicab industry. Now that it’s time for me to get my medallion, there are hardly any profits to share.

Taxicab companies have had to drastically lower the amount of monthly medallion holder payments. In many cases, the monthly checks made out to medallion holders have fallen below the monthly amounts those medallion holders must pay to pay off their medallion.

What was once something that provided a present and a future for working-class people is now an albatross around the neck. As long as the TNCs are allowed to operate, they will continue to devalue taxicab medallions. Although the SFMTA does not report any medallion loan defaults yet, these are sure to happen as long as Uber is allowed to operate and continue sucking the profits out of our industry. One can see how this might give potential medallion purchasers pause.

While the value of a medallion has fallen precipitously, the price has remained at $250,000 since the medallion sales programs started in 2010. The number of taxicab medallion transfers have slowed almost to a standstill. Market conditions demand the SFMTA go about lowering the medallion transfer price. It would be a good turn for taxicab drivers and the SFMTA.
On Tuesday, I will address the SFMTA board at its regular meeting and ask Director of Transportation Ed Reiskin to initiate the process of lowering the medallion transfer price. I will be suggesting a price between $125,000 and $150,000. If you agree, please show up and voice your support. Thank you.

Peter A. Kirby is a cab driver in San Francisco.

Tags: UberMTA
Categories: Labor News

The SFMTA should lower the taxicab medallion transfer price "What was once something that provided a present and a future for working-class people is now an albatross around the neck."

Current News - Thu, 07/16/2015 - 06:11

The SFMTA should lower the taxicab medallion transfer price "What was once something that provided a present and a future for working-class people is now an albatross around the neck."
http://www.sfexaminer.com/the-sfmta-should-lower-the-taxicab-medallion-t...
By Peter Kirby on July 15, 2015 7:26 pm
Career taxicab drivers are now being forced to buy taxicab medallions, rather than earning and receiving them for a one-time nominal fee. In recent years, the value of a medallion has dropped like a stone while the medallion price set by the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency has remained the same. Medallion transfers (purchases) have slowed to a trickle. For these reasons, the SFMTA should be responsive to market conditions and lower the medallion transfer price.

When I put my name on the taxicab medallion waiting list in 1998, I agreed to a deal whereby when my name got to the top of the list, I would be granted a taxicab medallion for a one-time fee of maybe a couple of thousand dollars. Once granted, I would take that medallion to the taxicab company of my choice and from there on out receive checks in the amount of about $2,300 per month for as long as I held the medallion. This was to be on top of whatever I made driving the cab. When I retired from the industry, the medallion was to go back to The City. That was a profit-sharing program, which provides for a middle class. That lets working-class people buy houses, raise kids and put them through college. It was a situation that provided working-class people with a secure financial future.

Then came the SFMTA’s medallion sales programs. Without being given an opt-out, the SFMTA changed the terms of my agreement without my consent. No longer could I earn a medallion for a one-time fee. Now I am forced to buy a medallion for $250,000 with a minimum down payment of $12,500 and about a 5 percent interest rate to pay off the rest over 30 years. Sure, I get to sell it when I’m done with it, but I need money now and, under the former deal, I could save for my future. As it stands now, I can forget about raising kids properly or buying a house.

Not only that, but in the meantime The City has allowed Uber and the other Transportation Network Companies to suck most of the profits out of the taxicab industry. Now that it’s time for me to get my medallion, there are hardly any profits to share.

Taxicab companies have had to drastically lower the amount of monthly medallion holder payments. In many cases, the monthly checks made out to medallion holders have fallen below the monthly amounts those medallion holders must pay to pay off their medallion.

What was once something that provided a present and a future for working-class people is now an albatross around the neck. As long as the TNCs are allowed to operate, they will continue to devalue taxicab medallions. Although the SFMTA does not report any medallion loan defaults yet, these are sure to happen as long as Uber is allowed to operate and continue sucking the profits out of our industry. One can see how this might give potential medallion purchasers pause.

While the value of a medallion has fallen precipitously, the price has remained at $250,000 since the medallion sales programs started in 2010. The number of taxicab medallion transfers have slowed almost to a standstill. Market conditions demand the SFMTA go about lowering the medallion transfer price. It would be a good turn for taxicab drivers and the SFMTA.
On Tuesday, I will address the SFMTA board at its regular meeting and ask Director of Transportation Ed Reiskin to initiate the process of lowering the medallion transfer price. I will be suggesting a price between $125,000 and $150,000. If you agree, please show up and voice your support. Thank you.

Peter A. Kirby is a cab driver in San Francisco.

Tags: UberMTA
Categories: Labor News

Global: Congratulations Amazon – 20 years of precarious work and low wages – shame on you!

Labourstart.org News - Wed, 07/15/2015 - 17:00
LabourStart headline - Source: UNI Global Union
Categories: Labor News

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